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Advice on an evergreen addition to my garden, please.

Discussion in 'NEW Gardeners !' started by KimG, Sep 4, 2019.

  1. KimG

    KimG Apprentice Gardener

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    Hi ,
    I have a small south-facing front garden at my late Victorian house in Kent. We have a 1 metre wall, but the plot is otherwise exposed, especially as we face a junction, so the wind and rain can whip in.
    We want to plant a single central evergreen feature needing minimal maintenance that will remain fairly low to the ground to avoid losing light to the house. Colour at some point in the year would be great. Any ideas you lovely people?
     
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    • Verdun

      Verdun Passionate gardener

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      Hiya Kim
      A yew would fit your criteria. Taxus Summergold for example. It’s evergreen, lovely yellow foliage, grows anywhere without problem, except on waterlogged soils, and makes a nice mound of foliage all year round. Can be topiarised. Easily kept to size.
      I have a variety here, no longer available I think, that has green and white leaves in winter turning orange copper in spring and then butter yellow in summer. Lovely thing.

      A choisya is worth considering.....aromatic foliage and scented white flowers in spring and summer....not called the Mexican orange blossom for nothing. Once established it is tolerant of wind and rain. Very tactile

      Pittosporums too are worth a look at......Tom Thumb has purple black evergreen foliage, Garnettii has grey/silver foliage. Lots of different varieties all with scented flowers in early summer and all low maintenance and easily kept to size.

      Euonymus varieties are mostly evergreen and many are variegated. Make good shaped bushes. Emerald n Gold is a beauty....smallish with foliage turning pinkier in winter and bright yellow and green leaves.

      Senecio Greyii is a lovely silver grey shrub wider than high, low maintenance, salt and wind resistant and has bright yellow flowers in early to mid summer.

      A few ideas Kim. Others are sure to add suggestions. :)

      The above will grow in most soils but do you know if your soil is acid or alkaline? If acid, you could consider azaleas, rhododendrons etc
       
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      • Clare G

        Clare G Super Gardener

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        You might take a look at junipers and rosemarys, too.
         
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        • KimG

          KimG Apprentice Gardener

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          Thank you, Verdun! Lots of great ideas. We have chalky soil and I particularly like your first two suggestions . Much appreciated.
           
        • KimG

          KimG Apprentice Gardener

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          Thanks, Clare
           
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          • ARMANDII

            ARMANDII Low Flying Administrator Staff Member

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            Hi Kim, other evergreen choices are Osmanthus which will give you in Spring thousands of tiny white flowers which, on a warm day, put out a gorgeous sweet scent you can smell several feet away


            [​IMG]

            or there's Garrya Eliptica

            upload_2019-9-4_16-28-13.jpeg

            [​IMG]

            I have both in my garden and they're now about 25 years old. They're both very hardy, easy to prune and keep under control should you wish to.:love30::cat-kittyandsmiley::coffee:
             

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          • KimG

            KimG Apprentice Gardener

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            Wow! Gorgeous Many thanks for these ideas, Armandii
             
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            • ARMANDII

              ARMANDII Low Flying Administrator Staff Member

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              You're most welcome, Kim:love30:
               
            • KimG

              KimG Apprentice Gardener

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              010C3F07-ED69-4C45-A5F9-F5ECE333AFB2.jpeg
              We went with a Pittosporum Nana in the end. Thank you, Verdun, for the suggestion, and to everyone else who replied
               
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              • Verdun

                Verdun Passionate gardener

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                Looks perfect there Kim :)
                 
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