agapanthus growing very slowly

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by flowerpotty, May 25, 2009.

  1. flowerpotty

    flowerpotty Gardener

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2008
    Messages:
    45
    Ratings:
    +0
    I bought some agapanthus bulbs from the garden centre in March and planted the three of them in a plastic container. The growing media is multipurpose compost with added grit for drainage. The bulbs were planted middle of March, Two have grown and are a few inches high. Is it necessary to feed them once a week now or twice a month. they have beed kept in an unheated greenhouse. I have fed them with miracle grow diluted down last week.
     
  2. Alice

    Alice Gardener

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2006
    Messages:
    2,775
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Perthshire
    Ratings:
    +80
    I think Agapanthus are just slow growing to start with Flowerpotty but do well if you can get them established. The link might help you.

    I've never had any real success with them myself, maybe just didn't look after them properly, but I had a neighbour who grew them in a big stone raised bed running up the outside of their boundary wall - maybe for about 50 yards - and they were just spectacular. So it can be done.

    Hope they come good for you but I think patience is required.
    http://www.gardenersworld.com/plants/pots-containers/agapanthus/
     
  3. flowerpotty

    flowerpotty Gardener

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2008
    Messages:
    45
    Ratings:
    +0
    Thanks for the advice i don't think they will flower for another 12 months or more, when they become potbound then i think they will throw up some flowering stalks hopefully!!!
     
  4. strongylodon

    strongylodon Old Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Messages:
    13,592
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Wareham, Dorset
    Ratings:
    +22,256
    Agapanthus are known to be an irregular grower, some flower every year, some intermitently. I have had some flower in 18 months from seed and then not flower for a couple of years. Just let them grow their own way. I have had them flower just as well in the ground as in pots so I am not sure the 'flower better when potbound' rule is true.
     
  5. Victoria

    Victoria Lover of Exotic Flora

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    19,899
    Occupation:
    Lady of Leisure
    Location:
    Portugal
    Ratings:
    +12,089
    I basically agree with all the comments here as to their care. I'm sure they don't need to be potbound as they are in borders and roundabouts here ... unless they are buried in pots, but I think not.

    The only thing I can add is they are not frost tolerant .... I actually lost a large clump I brought from the UK years ago this past winter with only two days hitting zero.

    A beautiful flower and they are blooming here at the moment (not unfortunately with me) .... they seem to like the white as well as the two blues here.

    Good luck with yours.
     
  6. garden_fiend

    garden_fiend Gardener

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2006
    Messages:
    142
    Ratings:
    +2
    On one of the Chelsea programmes last week an agapanthus grower recommended planting them in the ground in their pots, as you need to try and re-create their natural growing conditions. In Madeira they grow on the sides of the roads in very well drained conditions and they flower profusely. I think too much rich soil and feed will probably just produce lush leaves and no flowers. Hope that helps. GF.
     
  7. PeterS

    PeterS Total Gardener

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2005
    Messages:
    6,662
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    N Yorks
    Ratings:
    +4,011
    I would agree with Strongy and others about not needing to be pot bound. I bought a single bulb and planted it in the border. It has flowered the last two years and I am pleased to see it growing again this year. Being outside mine experienced -7C last winter and -8C the year before, but the bulb itself may have never gone below zero, as it is insulated by the thickness of earth.

    I suspect one problem is that many people like me buy a bulb and all the packet says is Agapanthus. I imagine that there are a lot of different varieties and cultivars with some being more hardy than others.

    I am currently growing more from seed - but I understand that it will be 4 years or more before they flower.
     
  8. Kristen

    Kristen Under gardener

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2006
    Messages:
    17,405
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Suffolk, UK
    Ratings:
    +12,380
    I have had plants in all my gardens that flower just fine.

    But everything I has read says "Keep any in pots crowded" and "Don't disturb the roots" - i.e. avoid moving / potting on if at all possible.
     
  9. Marley Farley

    Marley Farley Affable Admin! Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2005
    Messages:
    30,592
    Occupation:
    Grandmother Gardener Councillor Homemaker
    Location:
    Under the Edge Zone 8b
    Ratings:
    +14,097
    :thmb: I am in agreement with Vicky Strongy & PeterS.. They are slow growers whether in pots or in the ground... I am not convinced by the confined roots bit either.. I, like Vicky lost some to frost & others heavily damaged by it, but also strangely, some were untouched by it... They are very hap hazzard about flowering here as we just do not get the sunshine here that they like.. Some years I have had blooms on all others only a few,... :wink: So I would say be patient & they will suprise you..!:)
     
  10. strongylodon

    strongylodon Old Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Messages:
    13,592
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Wareham, Dorset
    Ratings:
    +22,256
    There are so many Agapanthus hybrids now, dwarf, variegated , silver blue, purple, all sorts so there will definitely be a difference in growth, flowering habit and hardiness.

    My three young A. Purple Cloud ony just made it through the winter.

    My parents were given a couple of tubers by a gardener at the Botanical Gardens in Madeira 25 plus years ago and one still produces white flowers the size of a football but not every year, fickle things!!:)
     
  11. walnut

    walnut Gardener

    Joined:
    May 25, 2006
    Messages:
    5,815
    Ratings:
    +14
    They need the correct drainage it's not the frost that sees them off if they are wet at root level when frost hits it will harm them mine both in the ground and in pots have survived no problem this winter,one trick I use is to plant some of my tropicals near to shrubs in the garden the soil stays dry even in wet weather but it ensures you don't get frost damage.My Cestrums (thanks my lady)Echium,Boliviana Fuchsia,Iochroma (australis)have all come through.
     
  12. PeterS

    PeterS Total Gardener

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2005
    Messages:
    6,662
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    N Yorks
    Ratings:
    +4,011
    I like that idea Walnut. I think you are quite right about wet being as much or more of a problem than cold. I think it happens with a lot of things. Penstemon growers use the word "persistant" rather than "hardy" to signify that winter wet is the main cause of death.
     
  13. Marley Farley

    Marley Farley Affable Admin! Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2005
    Messages:
    30,592
    Occupation:
    Grandmother Gardener Councillor Homemaker
    Location:
    Under the Edge Zone 8b
    Ratings:
    +14,097
    :gnthb: Hi Walnut, I have both my huge clumps in sheltered spots under trees & by shrubs, as you say. Drainage is very good in both places I made sure of that before I planted... :wink: No what I think did for mine, was the laying snow & then the very hard frosts on top of it that we had continuously for nearly a week after.... The drainage as I say is good there & a the soil never ever gets waterlogged or even stays wet for long... I cleared the soft horrid stuff away & just left them & I am very pleased to say they are shooting all over the place now... Small & slow, but new shoots & all looking happy...!!!!:yho:
    :scratch: I am thinking I will protect them a bit this winter though to be on the safe side.. One clump has great sentimental value so I really don't want to lose it....! :wink:
     
Loading...

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice