1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Following recent events, the Admin Team have a message for all members, which we hope will give some explanation and information.

    We would be grateful if you could take the time to have a read. Thank you.

    Click Here For More Info
    Dismiss Notice

Begonias

Discussion in 'Container Gardening' started by Loki, Oct 25, 2018.

  1. Loki

    Loki Total Gardener

    Joined:
    May 3, 2015
    Messages:
    1,352
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Middlesbrough
    Ratings:
    +3,282
    I'm new to these plants, I used to hate them, this year I've fell in love.
    My question is...... is it worth overwintering? My plants where bought as plugs, £1:50 at most
    How does that compare with overwintering? I'm guessing my begonias will bulk up?
    What do you do?
    Is it worth overwintering? If so, how do I do it?
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Mike Allen

      Mike Allen Super Gardener

      Joined:
      Jan 4, 2014
      Messages:
      630
      Gender:
      Male
      Ratings:
      +1,146
      Loki. Yes one of the little problems. Might I be correct in thinking you refer to Begonia semperviens, often used as edging plants, pink, red and white some with bronzed foliage? Usually these are discarded at the end of the season but they are easy to take cuttings from and even to pot up and keep the old plant through the winter. Keep them on the dry side, as even under glass over moist plants can suffer due to frost-like temperatures and conditions. In an unheated GH, a sheet of newspaper will often suffice overnight.

      Begonias are quite a large family. Even from plugs, various plants will produce a corm. These corms can be lifted, dried and stored over winter, or potted up and allowed to rest, just keepin the compost damp. Always remember, Begonia corms have a concave top. Aviod this from filling with water, the corm will soon rot.

      Begonia Rex is one of the big boys. Fantastic foliage and allowing for various methods of propagation. Cutting the veins of the leaves being a great favourite. Back to the sempervirens. My GH staging is covered with compost. This comes in handy at times as, such as B.sempervirens, allow the seeds to fall and bingo, you have plenty of new seedlings. Good Luck and enjoy your gardening.
       
      • Like Like x 2
      • SimonZ

        SimonZ Gardener

        Joined:
        Feb 9, 2009
        Messages:
        502
        Ratings:
        +239
        I arrive, as usual, fashionably late to this thread, and as such I fear it is too late to salvage my begonias. They were planted this summer and flowered fabulously. Unfortunately, it has not been possible to spend much time in the garden this autumn at all, mainly because I have barely been at home, and now the flowers are all gone and the plants are all but gone. They are in a container, and I was hoping to have them for at least two seasons, so I'm wondering what i should do now to maximise the chances of them re-emerging next spring or summer?
         
      • WeeTam

        WeeTam Total Gardener

        Joined:
        Mar 9, 2015
        Messages:
        1,813
        Gender:
        Male
        Ratings:
        +3,716
        Some of my begonias are about 5 years old. I lift them,dry the soil,rub it off,place begonia in an onion bag and leave them in the garage. Check for rot every now and then. Some go soft most make it to spring.
         
        • Agree Agree x 2
        • Mike Allen

          Mike Allen Super Gardener

          Joined:
          Jan 4, 2014
          Messages:
          630
          Gender:
          Male
          Ratings:
          +1,146
          Simon and friends. Been there done that etc. As I said in a previous post. Begonias are an exceptional class of plants. Perhaps other plants also offer so much. Neglected corm forming plants will contend with so much, then as we might think die. Take a look at the roots. Yes a tiny bulb/corm. So grow it on. For the fibrouse types, So the greenery has dried out and all seems lost. Trim of the dead looking bits. Pot the remaining roots in fresh compost. Wait and see. Come the spring new shoots may appear, so take cuttings. Please. Always remember. When taking cuttings from tubers and corms, DONT cut to the corm or tuber, leave a joint, this will enable yet anther shoot to grow.
           
        • HarryS

          HarryS Eternally Optimistic Gardener

          Joined:
          Aug 28, 2010
          Messages:
          7,897
          Gender:
          Male
          Occupation:
          Retired
          Location:
          Wigan
          Ratings:
          +13,644
          As Wee Tam , I lift and store my Begonia tubers in November. Rejecting any soft ones. I find on replanting indoors , mid March , about 75% will restart.
           

        Share This Page