Best tree for privacy

Discussion in 'Trees' started by NessaJ70, Sep 29, 2020.

  1. NessaJ70

    NessaJ70 Gardener

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    Hi, some new houses have been built just behind my mum's house and they are much bigger than expected so we'd like to plant a tree to help with privacy. It is an medium sized garden and already has a mature apple tree and a maple tree in a different part of garden. Ideally we're after an evergreeen tree (but know that may not be possible) and would like the tree to not get too wide as would overpower the garden. An enormous conifer was cut down a few years ago so don't want another one of those. I'd really appreciate any suggestions.
     
  2. Macraignil

    Macraignil Gardener

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    Maybe a Holly tree might fit what you are looking for.
     
  3. noisette47

    noisette47 Total Gardener

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    Hello, Arbutus undo is a very pretty, evergreen tree with white heather-like flowers followed by strawberry-like fruits. Attractive peeling bark too. The version 'rubra' has even prettier pink flowers.
     
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    • ricky101

      ricky101 Total Gardener

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      Hi,

      Photinia Red Robin, can be trained and easily kept to whatever shape and height you want, fast growing too.
       
    • Victoria

      Victoria Lover of Exotic Flora

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      Viburnum, Prunus lusitanica or Laurus nobilis, all evergreen and fairly quick growing.
       
    • Alisa

      Alisa Gardener

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      Evergreen cherry laurel, and can be shaped into hedge.
       
    • NessaJ70

      NessaJ70 Gardener

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      Thanks everyone, I shall look at all of those. I've read about a few deciduous trees that could work but would prefer an evergreeen if possible.
       
    • Silver surfer

      Silver surfer PLANTAHOLIC

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      Not instant, slower than many conifers, slim,lovely fresh green, takes trimming.
      Thuya occidentalis Smargd.
      Planted a double row to hide neighbours garage in old home.THUJA  OCCIDENTALIS  SMARAGD 01-02-2008 14-46-43.JPGTHUJA  OCCIDENTALIS  SMARAGD 23-04-2008 17-54-20.JPGTHUJA  OCCIDENTALIS  SMARAGD 24-09-2007 14-30-43.JPGTHUJA  OCCIDENTALIS  SMARAGD 24-09-2007 14-31-11.JPG
       
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      • MrsRake

        MrsRake Apprentice Gardener

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        How tall does it need to be? I’ve had great success growing ceanothus to about 15 foot, get an evergreen one and you won’t regret it. Red robin also does a good job, it isn’t such a dense screen but does a fair job especially in summer months when you are most likely to be in the garden feeling overlooked.

        Holly is great but it is very slow growing so get a big one!

        We have Portuguese laurel, bought then at 6 foot about 4 years ago, planted in complete shade and now we’ll over 12 foot. They are boring, but we’re cheap and effective for blocking a neighbour who hates us because we chopped down a tree they liked. Also They mind being pruned and are perfectly evergreen ( our red robins are never totally bare, but they shed a heck of a lot of leaves).
         
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        • NessaJ70

          NessaJ70 Gardener

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          Thanks very much, really helpful. I hadn't thought about a ceanothus so that could be a really good option. Red Robin is also something we've thought about :)
           
        • shiney

          shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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          A problem with Ceanothus is that they don't always live too long. :noidea:
           
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          • kindredspirit

            kindredspirit Gardening around a big Puddle. :)

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            Drimys winterii would probably suit.
             
          • Cuttings

            Cuttings Super Gardener

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            Good call, something different and attractive, but not that common, and maybe difficult to source, but generally pest and disease free, I would go for a mix of Pyracantha, evergreen, blossom in spring, berries in winter, quick growing, easy to train, pollinator friendly, feeds the birds in autumn, and if the new neighbours are nosey, they can have a face full of thorns :yahoo:
             
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