Best way to get rid of bamboo (and what type of bamboo is it?)

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Engelbert, Apr 6, 2021.

  1. Engelbert

    Engelbert Gardener

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    Hi all

    We have a patch of bamboo we want to remove. Also interested ot know what type it is. We've been in the house just over two years, and I wouldn't say that the plant has spread much in that time, but them I'm not sure at what rate it would usually spread. A few photos below.

    Any ideas from anyone more familiar with bamboo that I am (I know nothing!)

    Many thanks


    IMG_20210402_175732926.jpg


    IMG_20210402_175756051.jpg


    IMG_20210402_175740766.jpg
     
  2. Mitramonday

    Mitramonday Apprentice Gardener

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    First off - please note, I am NO expert gardener:scratch:, but I have 'dealt with' three similar looking bunches of bamboo in my life! On two occasions, where it was definitely spreading but I didn't want to eradicate it altogether, I found that cutting them down (using some strong secateurs/pruners) as close to ground level as possible, and then pouring boiling water into the hollow stems seemed to stop the spread. On the third occasion, where the bamboo was slap bang in the middle of my (inherited) border, and knowing just how hard it is to uproot it, I placed an advert in my local Facebook group, offering it free to anyone who wished to come and dig it up! I did also advise people, in the advert, that any roots should only be grown in pots, unless they wanted it to invade the whole garden. I wasn't sure if I would get any 'takers'...but I did AND they seem to have managed to remove all the roots (corms?) as there has been no re-emergence in two years = job done:biggrin::yay::yahoo:!!
     
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    • Black Dog

      Black Dog Gardener of useful things

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      On first sight it looks like the "fargesia" variant. They are a lot tamer than others and normally stay where they are planted.

      You should be able to just dig it out and throw it away. Preferably far away so it doesn't take root in your compost. After you got all of the roots it should be gone for good, although there can always be some left. But it's easily detected once new shoots appear. So pluck out any leftovers and you will be fine.
       
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      • NigelJ

        NigelJ Total Gardener

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        @Engelbert Cut off close to ground level then dig out, bear in mind the roots will be a tangled mass; a bit like mattress springs and similar consistency.
        I took one out a couple of years ago and found the best tool was a mattock, I had to go down about 12-15 inches to get them all out. No regrowth though.
        Strong boots recommended as the cut stems are a bit like a bed of nails.
        Refill hole with soil, compost and plant or plants of your choice and job done.
         
      • flounder

        flounder Gardener

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        It looks like fargesia rufa. Tools required trenching spade, mattock, breaker bar sturdy saw and voltarol, for when you're finished....would be funny if it wasn't true
         
      • Engelbert

        Engelbert Gardener

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        Many thanks for the helpful replies. Glad to hear it isn't one of the more invasive heavy duty types! I'll get my mattock to it next week then. I love the mattock, it's such a great tool!

        Cheers
         
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