Can anyone advise please.

Discussion in 'Trees' started by Upsydaisy, Jan 17, 2020.

  1. Upsydaisy

    Upsydaisy Total Gardener

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    My Dad's property is surrounded by Beech Trees in the front, worryingly we have recently noticed a large white patch on one of them. It is smooth to the touch and feels exactly like the rest of the trunk. Is this a cause for concern, could it spread to the other trees?? . All help will be greatly appreciated.Thanks:)IMG_20200117_145113.jpgIMG_20200117_145101_burst_01.jpg
     
  2. shiney

    shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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    I can't help with any info but it looks as though the tree is on public land - presumably local authority. You could ask them to look at it - or even ask advice from the Forestry Commission. Some years ago I got the FC to look at an Ash tree on the front of our property. They checked it out and it was diseased. The local authority sorted it out.
     
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    • Mike Allen

      Mike Allen Total Gardener

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      I typed in. white patch on beech tree trunk. on the net. Quite a bit of info.
       
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      • wiseowl

        wiseowl Friendly Owl ADMIN Staff Member

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        Good evening @Upsydaisy I am no expert and I am probably wrong,but I am sure I remember a past thread on here somewhere but I can't find it,but it could be lichen:dunno:
         
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        • Upsydaisy

          Upsydaisy Total Gardener

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          Thanks @shiney , it is actually in my Dad's garden, one of many!
           
        • Upsydaisy

          Upsydaisy Total Gardener

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        • Upsydaisy

          Upsydaisy Total Gardener

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          Thanks @wiseowl ,I'll look that up later this evening too.
           
        • pete

          pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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          Beech is well known for rotting.
          I've seen a couple of beech trees that have been blown down, not recently, but when they came down the trunks had pretty much splintered into all kinds of pieces.
          The timber was totally rotten right through and you could break it into pieces with your hands.

          The trees looked fine until they came down.

          If it appears to be a fungus when you touch it I would be worried.
          The mild wet weather might be allowing the fungus to romp away and show on the surface.
           
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          • Upsydaisy

            Upsydaisy Total Gardener

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            Thanks @pete, the trees must be at least 50yrs old as my parents moved there in 1970. You can't feel anything when you touch it, feels just like the normal bark.
             
          • Upsydaisy

            Upsydaisy Total Gardener

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            Just done some Googling and so far can't see any that resembles it, but will keep looking.
            Thanks everyone.:ThankYou:
             
          • pete

            pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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            Does it scrape off, if so what does it feel like, soft, hard, wooly etc.
             
          • Upsydaisy

            Upsydaisy Total Gardener

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            Didn't try that, I will next time I go over.:blue thumb::)
             
          • Sheal

            Sheal Total Gardener

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            It looks like it could be Beech scale UpsyDaisy. The RHS below thinks it's harmless but other sites say it could be the start of scale insect infestation.

            Beech scale / RHS Gardening

            I've got a large Beech in my garden but I've not seen this on it, mind you it's covered in lichen.
             
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            • Mike Allen

              Mike Allen Total Gardener

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              My previous post was something of a quickie.

              I have some recollections of a type of scale insect that can attack beech trees. Then also a fairly common attack, if it can be called that of lichen. Usually we picture a growth-like invader of forest trees. Lichen being among the simpler forms of plants.

              I agree with Pete in some respects. Beech-Fagus sylvaticus always appear to be strong and upright. Yet sometimes when cut down, the core wood appears to be rotten. Another strange thing about Beech. Very little will grow beneath a beech tree. I was always amazed when in the New forest. In the beech plantations. The fallen leaves, despite not being evergreen, would remain where fallen for years, without rotting and breaking down. Similar also with beech hedging. Autumn comes and goes. Unlike many other heding plants. The now dead and dried out leaves of the beech remain insitu. If in doubt. Please contact your local council. They will be only too pleased to assist.
               
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