chopping back Libertia Grandiflora

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by silu, May 1, 2018.

  1. silu

    silu gardening easy...hmmm

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    My clump of Libertia is looking decidedly sad after the hellish Spring/Beast from the East. I've checked and it's not dead and new growth is appearing.
    I normally only pull off a few dead leaves but feel it would look a damn sight better if I pruned the whole clump down to say about 4 inches. Has anybody ever done this and will I damage the plant by doing so?
     
  2. Verdun

    Verdun Passionate gardener

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    Hiya Silu
    I prefer to divide libertia. However, no I would not prune the whole lot back; I would only cut damaged stems back to ground level. If all are damaged then I would wait until new growth is a few inches high and then prune off the affected stems.
    In my experience, libertias can suffer during a wet winter if soil is heavy so if you do divide and replant....I would pot one piece.......I think improving drainage can help :)
     
  3. silu

    silu gardening easy...hmmm

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    Thank you @Verdun. It's not the drainage that is the problem, my soil being naturally sandy and post many many years of manure is actually very free draining, it was the horror winds in March April which did the damage along with damaging a Leylandii hedge which I inherited I hasten to add:) plus all my Ceanothus are quite brown in places:wallbanging:. They are all alive but not looking their best. This last winter has caused my garden way more damage than the tough winter of 2010/11. We had loads of snow that year (see Avatar!) which acted as an insulator, apart from a few branches of things which broke under the weight of snow I had no plants which suffered. My clump of Libertia is about 4ft in circumference, can I dig it up and split now or leave it till there is more new growth? It's not a plant I know much about other than it is on the tenderish side in comparison to most of my other herbaceous plants. Quite pretty in flower but not a favourite to be honest. I was going to sell most of it in my plant sale but it looked so poor I doubt anybody would have wanted any. I don't think I would, having looked at it:snorky:.
     
  4. Verdun

    Verdun Passionate gardener

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    Have you got one of the orange/red/copper taupo varieties silu?
    I think they are delightful as occasional vertical and uniquely colourful specimens. The flowers to me are secondary. I keep them much smaller than 4' across. They are admired here and make nice association with snowdrops, hellebores etc :)
    Dig it up and you should see roots like rhizomes spreading....use a serrated knife and cut them apart and pot up :)
     
  5. silu

    silu gardening easy...hmmm

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    Thanks @Verdun. No just the Grandiflora Chinensis. Have it is a white herbaceous border. Like the taupo variety but pushing my luck slightly with the variety I have, doubt taupo would appreciate Scotland too much!
     
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