climber to grow in planter

Discussion in 'NEW Gardeners !' started by McTavish14, Feb 11, 2019.

  1. McTavish14

    McTavish14 Apprentice Gardener

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    I have x 2 planters with trellis attached approx 32cm x10x10.
    I'd really like to grow some sort climber to cover side of concrete shed It gets sun late morning through to evenings in summer.
    Thinking of Clematis but totally baffled by all different types
    Any suggestions/advice welcomed
    I also need to know if I only need one plant in each planter and if so can I also put bedding plants in it?
     

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  2. andrews

    andrews Super Gardener

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    You could put a clematis that grows to 1 - 1.5m in the tubs.

    We grew ipomoea lobata (Spanish flag) last year and that put on a great show. Its not winter hardy so we treat it as an annual.

    If you want to totally cover the wall I would plant a climber in the ground as a big plant will need plenty of water and food.
     
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    • longk

      longk Total Gardener

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      It does kinda depend on where in the country you are but Clematis would be better in the ground and do better with the roots a bit cooler so;
      Maybe behind the Ceonotis (?) plant a Clematis cirrhosa variety. They're winter/spring blooming and will appreciate the Ceonotis helping to keep them a bit drier.
      Maybe behind the bush in the centre plant a hardy Passiflora, Jasmine or even a perennial Sweet Pea (or a combination of).
      I would plant those planters up with a combination of hardy spring and summer flowering bulbs.
       
    • Verdun

      Verdun Passionate gardener

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      Hiya McTavish14:)
      Those tubs area little small to produce plants to cover that wall.

      If you really want a clematis though check out Taylor’s or Thorncroft....they have lots of varieties and will suggest how vigorous they are and how suitable some are for containers. There are clematis to grow in those tubs though.....use John innes compost though

      If you can, as Andrews has suggested, plant in the ground any climber would perform so much better and look in keeping with

      Consider trachelospermum or jasmine if planted in the ground......scented flowers in summer and the trachelospermum has fantastic evergreen foliage

      You have some nice shrubs there.....clematis Montana is a vigorous variety producing masses of white or pink flowers in spring and would make an attractive backcloth on the wall....it would need to go in the ground:)
       
    • Redwing

      Redwing Wild Gardener

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      Climbers will do so much better planted in the ground as has been pointed out already. There are so many nice ones to choose from. I agree with @Verdun s recommendations for Taylors and Thorncroft as good clematis nurseries. The Taylors website is particularly good for growing conditions advice.

      Taylors Clematis

      Clematis from Thorncroft Clematis - Thorncroft Clematis Ltd: Chelsea Gold Medal Winning Clematis Nursery

      Edit: I’ve just had a look at the Thorncroft website. It’s had a revamp and is looking very good. Lots of info there too.
       
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        Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
      • andrews

        andrews Super Gardener

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        Ive always been pleased with clematis from Taylors. Planted a couple of small clematis in tubs last year and they put on a great show. The tubs are out of the sun, shaded by a fence so the roots keep relatively cool.
         
      • HarryS

        HarryS Eternally Optimistic Gardener

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        Taylors clematis is the best place for the info you need . It will describe if the clematis is OK for containers plus how big it would normally grow. Also its best orientation ( N S E W ). They would be better in a deeper pot of about 45cm , but should be ok in yours .
        If you want a smaller clematis - say up to 2 metres , these are called patio clematis . Just one per pot , and you could plant annuals around them in the spring.
         
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        • noisette47

          noisette47 Total Gardener

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          I'd cheat and take the bottoms out of the planters!:heehee: It seems a shame to forego the ready-made trellises, so whichever climbers you opt for will root into the soil once they've got established. Unless you go for plants that stick to concrete, like Hydrangea petiolaris, Parthenocissus or Ivy, it might be worth fixing up some strong wire supports so you can tie in the climbers as they grow.
           
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          • HarryS

            HarryS Eternally Optimistic Gardener

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            I have done that in a couple of places !
             
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            • Doghouse Riley

              Doghouse Riley Head Gardener

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              We've three montana clematis, two in 12" cubed plastic pots on our side drive growing up a fence and one in an 18" ceramic pot next to our front door,

              I can only find this photo from a few years ago of the one at the front of the house, the first year we had it.
              Now it's over the top of the door along that trellis right to the edge of the building, where I prune it off, it's quite thick now. I encourage bits to trail down over the top of the door.

              But like a lot of my stuff it's "trained." It has about five horizontal strands, spaced out, tied to bits of the top trellis. I let it grow out "sideways" from those. I prune any others off. The front of the house is north facing so it only gets some sun early in the morning.

              P1050816.JPG

              This one on the side fence. It doesn't get a lot of sun, just late afternoons.

              P1060519.JPG

              They are no trouble.
               
              Last edited: Feb 13, 2019
            • daitheplant

              daitheplant Total Gardener

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              Get a few climbing Fuchsias or a couple of Jasmines.
               
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