Don't look at your old house on Google Earth

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Graham B, Oct 17, 2020.

  1. Graham B

    Graham B Gardener

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    Out of curiosity, I had a look at my first house on Google Maps. I spent 6 years there turning a patch of dead clay into a beautiful, fairly mature garden. It added at least £20k to the house when we sold it, compared to the ex council houses around us.

    One of the main things was a wisteria. The garden had walls on two sides, with our back wall and a blank wall from the neighbours. I'd trained a Japanese wisteria macrobotrys up our wall on straining wires, to turn the feel from a council house yard into a small cottage garden. And I reseeded the small lawn, as a backdrop to the planting. Everything was low maintenance, so a couple of days a year pruning was all it needed. The last year we were there, I barely had to do anything beyond mowing and a little weeding.

    That was about 14 years ago, and I've not been back. I've just looked on Google Earth, and it's heartbreaking. The wisteria has been cut down, the lawn is destroyed, and it's all back to looking like a chavvy dump again.

    To be completely fair, we ripped the soul out of my current place when we had to cut down the overgrown cypress hedge around the back, to put up a proper fence. This place was always going to be a work in progress, considering the state of it when I bought it. And I've no argument with people who simply decide they prefer different plants. But if you're starting with something that's already beautiful, nailed, and low maintenance, why break it?

    Has anyone else had this with their old gardens?
     
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    • Jasmine star

      Jasmine star Gardener

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      Hi @Graham B that's heartbreaking :cry3: I've often wondered why anyone would buy a house with a beautiful garden and not maintain it or at least not destroy it. I understand it won't be to everyone's taste and people will want to change things but to look back and find it's a dump it awful.
       
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      • pete

        pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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        I'm sure when I go my my garden, and allotment will be full of the sound of chainsaws.

        Nobody will want what I have, I even envisage the pond being filled in, probably with the fish and frogs still in it.:frown:
         
      • Sienna's Blossom

        Sienna's Blossom Super Gardener

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        Oh that's really, really sad. It's one of the reasons I struggle so much with the thought of ever moving, when you've put so much love and heart and soul into a garden, and attracted precious wildlife, the thought of it all being destroyed is just unbearable.
         
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        • Selleri

          Selleri Super Gardener

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          Hey @Graham B , thanks :frown: I had a look at my childhood paradise, a large plot lovingly cultivated by my grandparents and later on, by me. Full of flowers, true cottage style where you have to weave your way past the flowers on the narrow paths, a riot of colours with veg tucked in...

          upload_2020-10-17_13-56-52.png

          This is just naturally gone to wilderness, it must be much worse when someone intentionally dismantles what used to be beautiful.

          Then again, many people just want the outdoor space for the trampoline, bbq and perhaps some summer bedding and think that bare walls and concrete are low maintenance.

          Each to their own I guess. On a positive note, the Covid situation has awaken many people to taking a hard look at their gardens and to take plunges into learning on how to move away from low maintenance concrete towards a bit of a green space. It's definitely happening just now. :)
           
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