Fruit Tree Fungus

Discussion in 'Pests, Diseases and Cures' started by andrews, Jan 7, 2019.

  1. andrews

    andrews Super Gardener

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    Noticed that one of my plum trees has a fungus growth, mainly on the west side of the tree. Ive read that its normally weak trees that will be attacked by fungus.

    Is there an effective cure or is it time to remove the tree ?

    IMG_3791.jpg
     
  2. pete

    pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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    Not sure but I think fungus on trees has some similarities to icebergs:smile:

    What you see is just the fruiting body, the real damage is well inside the wood.
     
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    • andrews

      andrews Super Gardener

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      I must admit that I don't hold out much hope but didn't want to sway any feedback
       
    • Marley Farley

      Marley Farley Affable Admin! Staff Member

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      I think they are a polypor fungus.. Did your tree get stressed in all the dry weather, a split or any damage to the bark.? The fungus itself doesn’t become active until the tree is diseased or stressed. Others establish themselves where a tree has been damaged – on the end of a broken branch, perhaps, or through a gouge in the bark.
      Most tree fungi consume decaying wood, but there isn’t a lot of that on a healthy tree. So some species cheat by giving out chemicals that cause rot in the surrounding wood. That gives the fungus a steady supply of food but eventually the infected branch or trunk will become brittle.. You can also spray the tree with a fungicide, such as Bordeaux mixture. It might help perhaps.. Regular sprays when buds are swelling, and again when the tree flowers, can help prevent infection. Is it an old tree.?
       
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      • andrews

        andrews Super Gardener

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        I think the tree is about 12years old. There is no damage to the tree although I am removing a lot of hawthorn that is dead / dying so that may not be helping.

        The tree didn't seem stressed although it didn't bear a lot of fruit
         
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