1. Forum News
    A NEW PHOTO COMP WILL BE STARTING THIS MONTH more information in Photo Competitions Photo Competitions Are Changing!
    Please Support The Road Verge Campaign!
    Dismiss Notice

Goodbye lawn hello plan 1,2 or 3?

Discussion in 'Garden Projects and DIY' started by clanless, Oct 29, 2018.

  1. clanless

    clanless Total Gardener

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,039
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Gentleman of leisure.
    Location:
    North Wales
    Ratings:
    +2,273
    Hi All,

    I've decided to rearrange a part of the rear lawn - into something more interesting - something more like this:


    Back garden rest area.gif

    I've 3 different potential layouts so far:

    Layout 1:

    Back garden.jpg

    Layout 2:

    Back garden 2.jpg

    Layout 3:

    Back garden 3.jpg

    The question is - which layout would you choose? :spinning:
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • 2nd_bassoon

      2nd_bassoon Super Gardener

      Joined:
      Jan 10, 2017
      Messages:
      296
      Gender:
      Female
      Occupation:
      Vet
      Location:
      Bristol
      Ratings:
      +955
      What sort of planting are you planning @clanless? I like layout 1 for a more formal look, or 2 and 3 would both suit something a bit looser/more cottagey...2 in my mind would call for smaller planting since the beds are right in the middle of the garden, compared to 3 where you could have some quite big stuff round the edges.

      I think my preference would be 1 or 3, and I would struggle to pick between them!
       
      • Agree Agree x 2
      • Clare G

        Clare G Super Gardener

        Joined:
        Mar 29, 2017
        Messages:
        367
        Gender:
        Female
        Location:
        London UK
        Ratings:
        +875
        I agree with @2nd_bassoon, all are attractive but 1 or 3 will give you the most planting scope. You could also consider getting rid of the grass altogether - particularly on 1, where I suspect those rings will prove fiddly to mow, and be too small to make much impact. Have a look at other kinds of edging, there are some fab and relatively inexpensive ones out there. Between my gravel and the flower beds I used a single row of secondhand London stock bricks, set in mortar. Looks good, but I was also tempted by the traditional rope-twist and scalloped edging tiles - and newer designs made out of recycled car tyres!
         
        • Like Like x 1
        • Informative Informative x 1
        • clanless

          clanless Total Gardener

          Joined:
          Jan 20, 2013
          Messages:
          1,039
          Gender:
          Male
          Occupation:
          Gentleman of leisure.
          Location:
          North Wales
          Ratings:
          +2,273
          Thanks all :blue thumb:.

          I quite liked the idea of planting herbs - as in the top picture - perhaps a mix of perennials in the more difficult to reach bedding areas and then annuals/herbs in the easier to reach areas. The top picture is described as a 'herb garden'. Hopefully the herbs can be used to good effect with my new veg plot - which is to the right of the new area.

          I'm in a bit of a quandry as below the new area will be what I call the formal bit - raised triangular beds, gravel in between and a pond - again perennials at the back of each raised bed and annuals at the front - which is why I'm going for the circular theme in the 'new' area and why option 1 is probably a no go as it is too regimented.

          Perhaps option 3 with a shrub or small bedding area in the centre of each circular lawn? I managed to revive a lovely Forsythia 'weekend' from the local garden centre - perhaps it would be at home in the centre of one of the circular lawns.

          All this and I've just put my name down for an allotment - it's never ending :dbgrtmb::).
           
        • HarryS

          HarryS Eternally Optimistic Gardener

          Joined:
          Aug 28, 2010
          Messages:
          8,122
          Gender:
          Male
          Occupation:
          Retired
          Location:
          Wigan
          Ratings:
          +14,000
          I agree with Clare , the ring and circular grass parts would look really effective . But they would be a pain to mow and maintain , I think.
           
          • Like Like x 1
          • Redwing

            Redwing Wild Gardener

            Joined:
            Mar 22, 2009
            Messages:
            1,499
            Gender:
            Female
            Location:
            Sussex
            Ratings:
            +2,635
            I like the herb garden layout in your first post and agree with @Clare G about the grass being fiddley to mow and maintain. Herbs have a habit or sprawling and look nice doing so over gravel. I like plan 1 without the grass. You can of course rearrange the herbs easily if you find they don’t work or add some flowers to compliment. Herbs are good for the pollinating insects and much better in that respect than plan 3. It depends on what you like; plan 2 would be nice too and let you indulge any passions for herbatious planting.......really depends on what is most important to you. Whatever you choose, the bench is most important!
             
            • Informative Informative x 1
            • clanless

              clanless Total Gardener

              Joined:
              Jan 20, 2013
              Messages:
              1,039
              Gender:
              Male
              Occupation:
              Gentleman of leisure.
              Location:
              North Wales
              Ratings:
              +2,273
              Hmm...lots of good advice and things to think about. I'm flitting from one design to the next, as has been pointed out each has it's own merits.

              Plan 1 without the grass is now the front runner. Whatever we do eventually decide to do - I'll post up some piccy's. :spinning:
               
              • Like Like x 1
              • alana

                alana Super Gardener

                Joined:
                May 5, 2008
                Messages:
                625
                Occupation:
                Head Gardener
                Location:
                Far East of Suffolk
                Ratings:
                +1,817
                You are so organised Clanless. I would go for the least maintenance option every time.

                I got rid of the lawn in part of my garden and just have a wiggly path with large mixed borders either side. I didn't have a plan but the structure was already in place with three trees and several shrubs forming the bones of the garden. I always make it up as I go along with new additions/introductions. I guess lack of finances has played a large part in my lack of planning because I couldn't splash out on so many plants at the same time.
                 
                • Like Like x 1
                • clanless

                  clanless Total Gardener

                  Joined:
                  Jan 20, 2013
                  Messages:
                  1,039
                  Gender:
                  Male
                  Occupation:
                  Gentleman of leisure.
                  Location:
                  North Wales
                  Ratings:
                  +2,273
                  In reality it will probably take a year or so just to get the basic structure into place - I've been working on the front garden for over a year and it's still not planted up - it's mostly bare soil/weeds at the moment - but I did manage to pick up 36 'free' perennial plugs from Thompson and Morgan - which have all been potted on and are growing like billy o.

                  Limited cash here as well - so I grow from seed - buy small plugs - take cuttings from friends plants (most of which I admit seem to die :doh:) - I can't afford to buy the more mature plants and in any case I do get pleasure from helping a plant grow to it's potential :spinning:.

                  I saw Monty a couple of weeks ago plant 3 fairly mature Summerina Brown - that's not real gardening in my book :).
                   
                • clanless

                  clanless Total Gardener

                  Joined:
                  Jan 20, 2013
                  Messages:
                  1,039
                  Gender:
                  Male
                  Occupation:
                  Gentleman of leisure.
                  Location:
                  North Wales
                  Ratings:
                  +2,273
                  Well, here's the first bit of fencing - posts installed last week - cross bars and uprights just now :thumbsup:. A pain to get it to look OK - notice that the lawn slopes towards the bungalow and that the pickets on each side are of a different length.

                  IMG_0169.JPGIMG_0168.JPG
                   
                  • Like Like x 2
                  • clanless

                    clanless Total Gardener

                    Joined:
                    Jan 20, 2013
                    Messages:
                    1,039
                    Gender:
                    Male
                    Occupation:
                    Gentleman of leisure.
                    Location:
                    North Wales
                    Ratings:
                    +2,273
                    This is the 'final' design - none of which appear above :scratch:.

                    Cost was a large part of the decision - with this design no gravel or edging needed - same bedding area and I can add the gravel at a later stage.

                    Just want to crack on with it now: :smile:

                    Back garden.jpg
                     
                    • Like Like x 6
                    • clanless

                      clanless Total Gardener

                      Joined:
                      Jan 20, 2013
                      Messages:
                      1,039
                      Gender:
                      Male
                      Occupation:
                      Gentleman of leisure.
                      Location:
                      North Wales
                      Ratings:
                      +2,273
                      Managed to find time to install another post today - builders merchants shut until 2nd January - so just have to get stuck into the mince pies :biggrin:.

                      I think that I might have been spending too much buying bags of pre made 'post fix' concrete - I've found out that I can make my own 'post fix' for half the price using plain old cement and gravel. So this should help to keep costs down. For info. the mix is 1 part cement to 3 parts gravel :dbgrtmb:.
                       
                      • Like Like x 2
                      • andrews

                        andrews Super Gardener

                        Joined:
                        Aug 28, 2018
                        Messages:
                        565
                        Gender:
                        Male
                        Occupation:
                        Waste Management and Consultancy
                        Location:
                        South Yorkshire
                        Ratings:
                        +1,276
                        Post fix isn't cheap. If you don't need the concrete to set quickly then its much cheaper to mix your own.

                        I fell lucky when I needed some for the polytunnel. Every bag on the pallet was ripped. The double bagged it and I asked if they would be selling it cheap. I got 10 bags for a pound a bag.
                         
                        • Like Like x 2
                        • Perki

                          Perki Super Gardener

                          Joined:
                          Jun 2, 2017
                          Messages:
                          753
                          Gender:
                          Male
                          Location:
                          Lancashire
                          Ratings:
                          +2,477
                          I reckon you'll end up joining them to beds together in future.

                          I think it look nice with a simple wavy path with a small island bed in the middle, could have a large bowl of water in the middle island bed surround by the thyme / other.

                          I grow a few monarda's, I like the idea of monarda / lavender together colour wise but they require different growing conditions, monarda can be fussy need moist soil but not to wet but never dry or they get powder mildew, you can give them perfect growing condition and they can still disappear. They could quite easy over power lavender shading them out and they require keeping a eye on, they creep out quite fast from the centre so need lifting and planting again. I think a nepeta would be a better alternative , maybe salvia verticillata for blue / purples.
                           
                          • Like Like x 1
                          • Doghouse Riley

                            Doghouse Riley Head Gardener

                            Joined:
                            Sep 1, 2009
                            Messages:
                            3,667
                            Gender:
                            Male
                            Occupation:
                            "Pleasantly unemployed."
                            Location:
                            The Tropic of Trafford, England.
                            Ratings:
                            +4,353
                            Some excellent ideas there.

                            With any intricate design involving beds, borders and grass, you have to be careful to avoid "border creep."

                            "Edging" is such a pain.

                            I faced this problem in our small garden ten year or so ago.

                            So for areas like this.

                            P1010015.JPG


                            I replaced what I had with this. A singe line of block paving bricks.


                            P1040199.JPG

                            Having had success with that, I extended the treatment to much of the rest of the garden.
                            The borders therefore haven't moved in ten years. I just wizz over the lot with my Flymo.
                            The bricks are on top of some hardcore and fixed with fine concrete mix and pointed up with dyed mortar, so are still in great condition, (photo from this year)

                            P1060518.JPG


                            P1000634.JPG

                            I did the whole length of the left hand border. The right hand one didn't need doing as the lawn is level with the path.

                            P1030723.JPG

                            As they weathered and the planting grew they became "less in your face."

                            P1060008.JPG

                            P1040727.JPG
                             
                            • Like Like x 1
                            Loading...

                            Share This Page

                            1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
                              By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
                              Dismiss Notice