Growing Potatoes from this year's crop?

Discussion in 'Edible Gardening' started by Liz, Sep 11, 2014.

  1. Liz

    Liz Gardener

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    Hi all,
    Owing in part to a very late start on the allotment, we have a large number of small potatoes. The crop has been healthy, no diseases apart from slug damage and some scab which I think is due to very dry conditions in the early growth.
    Does anyone else save small potatoes for next year's crop rather than buying in seed potatoes? And if so, will we be asking for another crop of small potatoes if we select small ones to plant?
    We always have difficulty finding the varieties we want in small quantities, unless we can find a potato day somewhere, and end up spending more than we'd like.
     
  2. Steve R

    Steve R Soil Furtler

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    I know that many do save their own spuds for next years seed, I do not and buy in fresh certified seed every year to reduce the risk of crop failure as much as possible. So I would say no, although someone will be along shortly here to say yes.

    As for buying small quantities, look for a Dobbies garden centre as they sell in small amounts, I think it was 5 for a pound when I saw them in our local dobbies in spring this year.

    Eat your small spuds and enjoy them, buy in fresh seed. Do some local research I'm certain you'll find the quantities you require somewhere.

    Steve...:)
     
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    • JWK

      JWK Gardener

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      I used to keep a few Pink Fir Apple spuds to grow again the following year as it was very difficult to find unusual varieties years ago. It's much different now, even Wilkos stock them and being certified disease & pest free as Steve R says it's well worth buying them fresh each year.

      This year has been another bad one for Blight so unless you are absolutely sure yours are clean then don't do it.

      What variety is it Liz?
       
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      • Liz

        Liz Gardener

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        Hi, thanks both:)
        Varieties are Pink fir apple, Desiree, Arran victory, and Apache. I too have been growing Pink fir apple for a while now, I find it always produces a reasonable crop. I've grown it from saved potatoes before but as you say getting more freely available. The Apache this year were grown from tubers bought in Morrisons for eating, I liked them so much I thought I'd try them- I'd not heard of them before.
        I'll have a look at Dobbies, not heard of them either!
        We've been very lucky on our allotments, no blight so far on potatoes. I thought my neighbour's tomatoes looked sad but she says it was a frost last week. I'm doubtful but time will tell. My tomatoes are in the greenhouse and fine so far.
         
      • Steve R

        Steve R Soil Furtler

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        • Scrungee

          Scrungee Well known for it

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          Blight is all too often mistaken for an early frost at this time of year.
           
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