How do you prop up an Amaryllis?

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Kristen, May 25, 2021.

  1. Kristen

    Kristen Under gardener

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2006
    Messages:
    17,534
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Suffolk, UK
    Ratings:
    +12,662
    [​IMG]

    That stem is 80cm ...

    The cane I put in is bending under the strain, so I've had to lean it against the "counter" ...

    I need a better system. Most of my Amaryllis turn out like that. Well ... that is until they become this:

    [​IMG]

    I was thinking of using a wire coat hanger, turning a circle at one end, and putting that in the bottom of the pot in the hope it would be held in place by soil / rootball, and then a loop at the other end, to contain the leaves and flower. Maybe I would need two coat hangers, with loops at 30cm and 50cm above the pot surface.
     
  2. NigelJ

    NigelJ Total Gardener

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2012
    Messages:
    4,545
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Mad Scientist
    Location:
    Paignton Devon
    Ratings:
    +15,935
    @Kristen Nice amaryllis. I know the problem well and generally have ended up wedging the pot in the corner of a windowsill with flower supported by the corner and pot trapped against something heavy.
    The problem is that the pot is too small for the flower head so anything based in the pot will have problems. It requires fastening to an external independent support or increasing the base area of the pot for example by securing pot to a square of plywood. Neither necessarily attractive solutions.
    Maybe a jardiniere might work.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Kristen

      Kristen Under gardener

      Joined:
      Jul 22, 2006
      Messages:
      17,534
      Gender:
      Male
      Location:
      Suffolk, UK
      Ratings:
      +12,662
      Thanks. I have (in the past) put pots into bigger "outers", and filled them with gravel, under and around the plant's pot. That definitely stops the pot falling over, but the plant is still too top heavy (and may have grown weak, because indoors/forced at this time of the year ...) so I reckon I still need a support that will stop the "top" flopping.

      They are in tiny pots - much the same as they come with in a "kit". Been like that for years ... they are on the irrigation bench in greenhouse in summer, and get fed there with everything else. I could go for a bigger pot? although they have never seemed to need it.
       
    • NigelJ

      NigelJ Total Gardener

      Joined:
      Jan 31, 2012
      Messages:
      4,545
      Gender:
      Male
      Occupation:
      Mad Scientist
      Location:
      Paignton Devon
      Ratings:
      +15,935
      No they don't seem to need big pots and may be more likely to suffer from root rot if in a bigger pot and not drying out between watering or when dormant. Yes the stem is probably too weak from for the flower head due to light levels etc. The best one I had flowered on a stem about a foot tall no problem with stability, never repeated that though.
      Possibly put coat hanger wire down centre of hollow stem out at the bottom and into the compost, not keen on that myself.
       
      • Like Like x 1
      • Kristen

        Kristen Under gardener

        Joined:
        Jul 22, 2006
        Messages:
        17,534
        Gender:
        Male
        Location:
        Suffolk, UK
        Ratings:
        +12,662
        Thanks, good to know that, I'll leave them as they are :)

        I did think of using some florists wire down the stem (I don't own any to try), but not sure that it would be strong enough - its very thin, so if it "won't bend" that might be viable?
         
      • shiney

        shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

        Joined:
        Jul 3, 2006
        Messages:
        54,943
        Gender:
        Male
        Occupation:
        Retired - Last Century!!!
        Location:
        Herts/Essex border. Zone 8b
        Ratings:
        +102,731
        I don't think florist wire will work but shall check with the oracle.

        My solution:- Nail in ceiling and poly string down and around stem. :ideaIPB:
         
        • Like Like x 1
        • Kristen

          Kristen Under gardener

          Joined:
          Jul 22, 2006
          Messages:
          17,534
          Gender:
          Male
          Location:
          Suffolk, UK
          Ratings:
          +12,662
          You're on to something there:

          [​IMG]
          Chelsea 2013
           
        • shiney

          shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

          Joined:
          Jul 3, 2006
          Messages:
          54,943
          Gender:
          Male
          Occupation:
          Retired - Last Century!!!
          Location:
          Herts/Essex border. Zone 8b
          Ratings:
          +102,731
          See! told you so! :yay: :roflol:
           
          • Funny Funny x 1
          • pete

            pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

            Joined:
            Jan 9, 2005
            Messages:
            39,277
            Gender:
            Male
            Occupation:
            Retired
            Location:
            Mid Kent
            Ratings:
            +61,120
            Real problem is you are growing it at the wrong time of the year.
            They sell them as houseplants but best overwintered in a cool greenhouse leafless.
            It then comes into growth around April, (in a normal year, but May in one like this year), and flowers in June on shorter stronger stems, it then remains in leaf until you dry it off for its winter rest around September.

            June 07 001.jpgJune 07 128.jpg
             
            • Agree Agree x 1
            Loading...

            Share This Page

            1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
              By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
              Dismiss Notice