How to remove those weeds?

Discussion in 'Gardening Discussions' started by tristanstartsgardening, Mar 11, 2019.

  1. tristanstartsgardening

    tristanstartsgardening Apprentice Gardener

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    I think the weeds underneath the bushes are overgrowing and absorbs nutritions that are supposed to be for bushes. Please see the attachments.

    What's the effective way of removing those weeds?

    Thank you.
     

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  2. LauraRoslin

    LauraRoslin Gardener

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    It's ivy, isn't it? So it's one of those plants that's only a weed when it's in the wrong place.
     
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    • Mike Allen

      Mike Allen Super Gardener

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      I like your comment Laura, how true. Ivy (Hedera) is often grown as pot plants etc. Yes it can be very decorative and it can also be pain.
      To get rid of it. If it's growing against a wall or fence, then chemicals can help. On the other hand, if it's close to trees etc then it must be dug out.

      Having worked in an ancient woodland. Attention was often directed toward ivy growing up trees. It could never, as far as I recall, be determined if in time the ivy would end up killing the tree. If in doubt.......dig it out.
       
    • NigelJ

      NigelJ Total Gardener

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      If you decide to remove the Ivy it's probably a hands and knees job pull it out. You'll need to get the roots out and weedkiller risks the shrubs as well. Ivy is quite difficult to kill with weedkiller as the leaves are difficult to wet. You can try adding a few drops of washing up liquid, or maybe a gel based product.
       
    • Verdun

      Verdun Passionate gardener

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      I don’t find ivy too difficult to eradicate if it can be accessed.
      Cutting at the woody base and applying SBK to those cuts will effectively kill ivy growing up walls, fences etc:)
      Yep, on hands and knees and simply pulling out the runners is effective too....a job to repeat now n then to completely eradicate ivy.
      Ivy is partially resistant to glyphosate weed killers applied to green foliage.....foliage needs to be bruised somewhat and a drop or two of detergent added to the weed killer.
      I have no problems with ivy here now ...when the odd piece occurs it is easily pulled up:)
       
      Last edited: Mar 12, 2019
    • tristanstartsgardening

      tristanstartsgardening Apprentice Gardener

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      I am not entirely sure whether should I remove ivy or not. So another question is: will ivy eventually kill bushes?
       
    • shiney

      shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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      We don't bother to remove ivy underneath hedges. The occasional pulling out or cutting back seems to be sufficient and a well established hedge will ignore any infringing ivy. Just don't let it climb up the hedging as it can become a nuisance.

      Re whether ivy kills trees:- there has been considerable discussion over decades about that. The theory is that it has little, or no, effect on healthy trees and, of course, helps to provide good habitat for wildlife. They say that when ivy has taken over considerably on a tree, that the tree is already in trouble. Apparently, ivy grows more vigorously when the tree canopy is sparse or open (seems natural as more sunlight gets through) but if the canopy is sparse then the tree is already having problems. There have been incidents of the older ivies (up to 6" trunks) actually supporting old and dying trees.
       
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      • Mike Allen

        Mike Allen Super Gardener

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        Here I have to say yes. In previous posts I have mentioned questions such as: Will Ivy kill that tree? So we can vist any woodland and see trees engulfed in ivy. Ivy (Hedera) clings to surfaces by short-like tendrils. These tendrils do not penetrate the outer suface of the bark, equal to our skin, the epidermis. So no damage is done. No sap etc is drained from the tree or shrub. However if left unattended. A shrub/bush that has become host to Ivy soon becomes engulfed, covered. The ever wandering stems of the ivy will gradually constrict the branches and stems of the shub, thus cutting off the supply of sap. In addition the rapid growth will soon cover and block out the valuable sunlight. This reduces and eventually stops the action knowns as photosynthesis, this in turn denies the plant from producing vital sugars along with other nutrients. So the plant now being prisoner and being denied these essencials will give up and die.
         
        Last edited: Mar 13, 2019
      • LauraRoslin

        LauraRoslin Gardener

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        I would say no. Just don't let it grow upwards through the bush. And when it starts to grow too far out, just pull that bit up. Ivy is good for wildlife, it's best left alone where possible.
         
      • Sian in Belgium

        Sian in Belgium Total Gardener

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        A very interesting debate...
        I would add another aspect - competition for nutrients, and when in windy situations.
        The building plot next to us had slowly become scrub woodland over the past 30 years, as the owner never had the funds to build on the plot, and then the area got "nature area" status, so no new development is allowed. Established trees were left to their own devices, and "wild" trees popped up. All became covered with ivy - with thick stems over 10" across winding up the trunks. It is a windy site, exposed, on the side of a valley. In the winter, the trees were caught and thrown around by the gales, as the evergreen ivy acted like a sail. A new owner has bought the land, and I mentioned the risk the ivy was posing to the trees. He cut all the stems at the base, and at 6', so the ivy died back. Despite the gales we've had over the past winter, none of the trees have fallen, and are all looking healthier. The oak tree, probably well over 100 years old, is looking much happier!

        Anyway, I digress!

        I would remove any ivy growing up through the bush/shrub, but leave those stems that are acting as groundcover. They are a wildlife habitat, and are preventing soil erosion and more aggressive weeds, such as bindweed.
         
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        • tristanstartsgardening

          tristanstartsgardening Apprentice Gardener

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          I think I should point out that the bushes I am talking about aren't really tree. The bushes in my garden are small, which might be more vulnerable than trees.

          Please see the attachment below.
           

          Attached Files:

        • Verdun

          Verdun Passionate gardener

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          Yes tristanstartsgardening, clear out that ivy.:) Small bushes will certainly be overrun by the ivy, flowers will be smothered and growth restricted.:) Besides, if unchecked it will look awful:sad:
           
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