Internal electric propagator temperature

Discussion in 'Tools And Equipment' started by luciusmaximus, Nov 26, 2019.

  1. luciusmaximus

    luciusmaximus Total Gardener

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    Could someone tell me what the temperature of an electric propagator is please? I need something to use as a drying/ curing place for my resin art and a friend suggested using the propagator as a means of keeping the resin at a stable temperature and dust free. The internal temperature needs to be 18-20 degrees.
     
  2. ricky101

    ricky101 Total Gardener

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    Hi,

    Seems there are 3 types of heated propagator: -

    Without a thermostat, so you would need an external one.

    With a non adjustable stat, and the values is usually specifed, eg Stewarts specify 18 to 23 C
    Stewart 52cm Thermostatic Controlled Electric Propagator | Electric Propagators | Keen Gardener | The Online Garden & BBQ Centre | Keen Gardener

    Those with a user adjsutable stat, but pricier.
    Stewart 52cm Variable Control Electric Propagator (Black) | Stewart Propagator | Keen Gardener | The Online Garden & BBQ Centre | Keen Gardener
     
  3. CarolineL

    CarolineL Super Gardener

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    Might be worth buying a cheap thermometer to keep inside the propagator and then adjust the temperature by opening vents. As @ricky101 said, they normally give temp around 20 C otherwise they'll fry seedlings.
     
  4. ricky101

    ricky101 Total Gardener

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    Hi,

    Thinking about it, would a simple clear storage box do the job, surely 18-20c is room temperature or just putting it in an warm airing cupboard.
    Generally such resins /glues tend to cure faster the warmer they are ..?




    000064.jpg
     
  5. luciusmaximus

    luciusmaximus Total Gardener

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    Thanks for the replies. I have turned the thermostat up to 20 degrees and put the heating on constant. However, it seems to be quite difficult to keep the temperature absolutely constant - in my house anyway. I've had problems with the resin reacting to temperature fluctuations. I sent a couple of pieces to the people I bought the resin from and it was their considered opinion that the temperature is not stable enough for proper curing to occur. I have tried the plastic box but it doesn't seem to help, but unless the temperature is stable I suppose it wouldn't. I'm struggling to produce anything of a saleable quality :wallbanging: and the resin is very expensive :hate-shocked:. Hence the suggestion by a friend for using a propagator. The resin will probably be easier to work with in warmer months but I can't wait that long. I have a commission to finish and stock to deliver to gift shops.
     
  6. andrews

    andrews Super Gardener

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    How about an insulated box with a low wattage tube heater controlled by an inkbird temperature controller ?

    Set the temperature at 19 degrees and it will fluctuate around this value. I think you can also set the sensitivity on the inkbird to reduce the temperature swing
     
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    • ricky101

      ricky101 Total Gardener

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      Hi,

      Agree with @andrews if temperature is that critical.

      I use a similar set up for a small enclosure growing orchids at 15c, however for best results you need to add a small fan to keep the air and heat moving evenly.

      If your box is small a tubular heater might be too big, so look at heating mats and heating bulbs used on fish tanks and vivariums.

      Also consider the reptile type of heat controllers as some are proportional which gives a much more even temperature than simple on/off control.
      Reptile Heating Equipment | Reptile Centre
       
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