Is this fireblight?

Discussion in 'Trees' started by Rebekah, Sep 21, 2019.

  1. Rebekah

    Rebekah Apprentice Gardener

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    P1010835.JPGP1010833.JPG I'm new to this site, and found it during some anxious searching on the topic of fireblight. We have a mature cotoneaster tree which I suspected earlier this year had fireblight; I cut off as much of the affected branches as i could, though probably not to the advised clearance length because they were difficult to reach. We hope that as a mature tree it might survive. However, before this was suspected we planted, a few yards away, a rowan sapling, about 10' tall, and have just returned from holiday to find its leaves are all brown and curling at the edges, and I suspect that this is also fireblight, in which case I think we'll need to get rid of the whole tree. Would be grateful for any thoughts.
     
  2. Marley Farley

    Marley Farley Affable Admin! Staff Member

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    Hi @Rebekah i have not had experience of it myself but you might some helpful advice HERE
     
  3. Redwing

    Redwing Wild Gardener

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    If the Rowan is recently planted and you’ve been away, it could be suffering from lack of water. I would give it a soak now. You won’t really know what it is though until growth starts again next spring.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2019
  4. Rebekah

    Rebekah Apprentice Gardener

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    Thank you Marley, l've read so much but not found any good pics of affected Rowan, and want to be as sure as l can before signing its death warrant!
     
  5. Rebekah

    Rebekah Apprentice Gardener

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    Thank you Redwing, I'm pretty sure it's not lack of water as I've been very careful in that regard, and a birch planted at the same time, and getting the same attention, seems fine.
     
  6. Fern4

    Fern4 Total Gardener

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    Hi @Rebekah

    We're having a similar problem here. An old apple tree looks to have fireblight and a mature sycamore next to it has failed to produce any leaves this year so it's not looking too good for either tree. The only thing to do is fell both I feel as I didn't even realise when we bought the house that fire blight was the culprit. I would hate to lose my lovely hawthorn trees as I know they are susceptible as is cotoneaster. Sorry about yours.....hopefully it will survive. As for the rowan, i think I'd probably get rid of it.
     
  7. Rebekah

    Rebekah Apprentice Gardener

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    Thank you Fern4, it's such a big decision to take out established trees isn't it, but also a bid decision to get rid of a new, costly tree that l've spent all year nurturing! But l think it's going to come to that....
     
  8. Rebekah

    Rebekah Apprentice Gardener

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    Well l'm massively relieved as l sent an email with pictures to the nursery from where we bought the rowan, and also took photos and samples of both trees down to the local garden centre, and both are agreed the rowan is suffering from underwatering (sorry, Redwing) but not fireblight, and the garden centre also thinks the cotoneaster has a fungal infection rather than fireblight. So I'm wrong on every count but very relieved. Will give the rowan another good water and some tlc. Thank you to all for your comments.
     
  9. Rebekah

    Rebekah Apprentice Gardener

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    One thing I have learned is never again to plant trees in late spring. I had thought l was keeping the tree well watered but evidently not. We only planted it then as we were desperate for some cover on an exposed gap, and had been waiting for six or seven months for some promised advice.
     
  10. Redwing

    Redwing Wild Gardener

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    It is surprising how much water newly planted trees need; the larger the tree the more difficult to establish and the more water required. It’s always best to plant biggish trees in the autumn. You’ll need to water next year too.
     
  11. Rebekah

    Rebekah Apprentice Gardener

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    It wasn't the biggest tree but anyway...l'll keep watering it next year. Thanks again.
     
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