Laburnum seeds

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Paladin, Jul 26, 2005.

  1. Paladin

    Paladin Gardening...A work of Heart

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    Aquired ;) some seeds today and need to know if I have to prep them before planting and the best medium to use for planting,in fact,anything relevant.
     
  2. pete

    pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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    They self sow around here, so dont think much is really needed in the way of special treatment.
    Perhaps a soak in warm water until the seeds swell might be an idea.
     
  3. Fran

    Fran Gardener

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    Not tried to grow them from seed, but as I recall they have a hard outer case (besides being toxic) so I would suggest soaking them overnight, before sowing.

    Re planting medium - I would just use an ordinary sowing mix. I use 50/50 multipurpose compost and vermiculite - works for me.
     
  4. Rich

    Rich Gardener

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    Most seeds that self sow such as these need a "winter" before they grow.

    Sprinkle them on a small pot of sand and place in a plastic bag in the fridge for about 5 weeks. Take them out and they should germinate.
     
  5. pete

    pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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    Just a point Rich, I realise what you are saying, but if the seeds do germinate in 5-6 weeks time, do you think there is a possiblity that they wont make big enough plants to go through the winter.
    Maybe it would be best to let them have a real winter and germinate next spring.
    What do ya think. [​IMG]
     
  6. Fran

    Fran Gardener

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    Well leaving it til the spring, would certainly get over the low light problem in winter and make for stronger seedlings. The cold is less of a problem, cos you can protect if growing in pots. [​IMG]
     
  7. pete

    pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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    The thing that bothers me about it is that, its OK germinating seed from warmer parts, relitivly late in the season, if you can keep up the heat and light in the winter, but this is a deciduous tree that has a definite resting period. Therefore it will go into dormancy in winter, and if its not got a lot of growth behind it, it will probably die.
     
  8. Paladin

    Paladin Gardening...A work of Heart

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    Pete,Fran and Rich,thanks. Shall "chill" them in the spring then. ;)
     
  9. Rich

    Rich Gardener

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    Another way is to fill a clay pot with sand, plant them in that in late autumn and leave them outside all winter. This worked for me when growing acer and wild rose seeds.

    I say a clay pot because it is less likely to be blown over, and I say sand to avoid waterlogging, and with fewer nutrients a better root system is formed.
     
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