Lawn Damaged

Discussion in 'Lawns' started by Dave Keenan, Nov 9, 2020.

  1. Dave Keenan

    Dave Keenan Apprentice Gardener

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    Hi,

    New to the forum but have an aim to have my lawn look like Wembley!

    I have made good progress in restoring an unloved lawn this summer but we've had some work done today, the lawn was obviously wet and part of the lawn is looking like a bit of a mudbath where it has been walked over etc. My question is whether I should do anything with it now, and if so what, or whether I should just leave it for now to recover itself and see what work needs doing to it in spring?

    Thanks,

    Dave
     
  2. WeeTam

    WeeTam Total Gardener

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    Should be fine,happens to mine all the time. But going over it with a garden fork poking in some holes aerating it may speed up recovery.
     
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    • Mike Allen

      Mike Allen Total Gardener

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      Hi Dave. I have to be honest. IMO a nice lawn really sets off a garden. However it will cost you, time and money. If I may. So your lawn tends to become boggy. Keep off of it. There is very litle you can do for it in that condition. I agree with Wee Ram about spiking it etc, but your weight on soggy ground is multplied many times.

      I suggest you wait until the lawn dries out. Then if there is still favourable time to give it a cut, do so. Perhaps fair to say, a lot will also depend upon the grass, whether seeded or turved. So taking it, that you are content with your lot. Depending upon the area of your lawn. You might consider getting a string line and marking off a suitable width. Now either using a hand-fork, hollow tine preferably, systematically working backwards, areate the ground. The hollow tines will take out cores of soil, thus leaving masses of holes in the ground. Having completed this. Spread a generouse amount of sharp sand over the whole area. This is actually best done by brooad spreading, say half a shovel of sand and swinging the body around so that the sand is well spread. Don't panic id by now your lawn resembles a kids sand pit. Now if you can obtain a n Ash rake. This is a woodn rake made of ash and is abobot 2'6 wide. Using it turned over, now systematicaaly brush the sand back and forth, the holes will become filled. This is a method used by green keepers and bowling green keepers. Trust me. It works.
       
    • Graham B

      Graham B Gardener

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      With the benefit of hindsight, I'm going to suggest not getting there in the first place. Workmen generally don't have much respect for the area around them. A few OSB or cheap ply 8x4 boards can help save your high-traffic areas, and sit at the back of the garage when not needed.

      Of course that doesn't help you much right now! :sad:

      Like the others say, leave it alone and it'll sort itself out. While it's still wet, anything you do is going to make things worse, and especially walking on it. Improved drainage is good if you're on clay, but on other soils you likely don't need it.

      Grass is pretty good at recovering on its own. It's evolved to survive being churned into a mud bath by cows' hooves, after all.
       
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