Leylandii and others

Discussion in 'Wanted' started by wkdwhite, Dec 31, 2006.

  1. wkdwhite

    wkdwhite Apprentice Gardener

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    I am looking for leylandii and some other plants and or seeds, as im just starting out.
    I am looking for some leylandii cuttings as they make a fanstastic hedge and really quick and i like the look of them.
     
  2. geoffhandley

    geoffhandley Gardener

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    Are you really sure? I have some 200 foot length hedges of them and believe me they are a recipe for slavery as you try to keep them under control.
     
  3. Hornbeam

    Hornbeam Gardener

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    Avoid leylandii - you will regret it if you plant them.
     
  4. good digger

    good digger Gardener

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    Lleylandii are the curse of modern living they have no place in gardens at all they sap nutrients from the ground depriving all the other plants of them they grow at such a rapid pace they cause all manner of problems, they are not plants they are a virus you will be very very unpopular with your neighbours if you plant them and they are such a big problem on a national scale that they are coverd in the governments new anti social behaviour bill they are a very anti social tree and to plant them is considered the height of bad taste and seriously short sighted poor judgement. If you plant them your neighbours can and probably will take you to court to have them removed they damage gardens,land and buildings all plants nearby to them will suffer greatly because the lleylandii are so good at robbing nutrients from the ground your garden will be like a dark desert within a year of planting these monsters, people would think better of you if you planted TRIFFIDS instead, i would rather have honey fungus in the garden than lleylandii, i cannot imagine why anyone would plant them, do the planet a favour and plant a native deciduous tree instead
     
  5. Fran

    Fran Gardener

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    They do make a dense hedge - and if pruned hard twice a year can be kept in bounds, but like the others, I find them death to plants in the vicinity, and boring to look at - besides being not very friendly. Time was when neighbours were to be cultivated, not excluded.

    My neighbours planted leylandii at the bottom of their garden, to prevent the house at the bottom overlooking. They are now about 25 foot high, and the poor unfortunate people who live at the bottom have a north facing garden, so they must be always in shade. My neighbours have now planted them along my fence line - not a problem light wise but I will be exceedingly cross if they affect my established shrubs and roses with their greed and thirst. I'm keeping my fingers crossed, and my mouth shut at the moment.
     
  6. good digger

    good digger Gardener

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    If the trees that your neighbours selfishly and thoughtlessly plant along the fence line reach above a height of 2 meters you can get the local authority to take action against them under the high hedges law in the anti social behaviour bill, I wouldn't be happy at all with these monsters neighbouring my property,if they do take nutrients from your garden you will have a case against them, but you can dig along your side of the fence and expose the roots of the trees and your are within the law to cut any root that is on your property or leave them exposed to the air to kill them or if roots persisit on your side poison them, you are within the law to do this your neighbour must be deeply disturbed to plant these trees,in my opinion to plant them in a residential area is the product of a disturbed mind.
     
  7. wkdwhite

    wkdwhite Apprentice Gardener

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    I had leylandii at my old house as a screen to hide a part of the garden that had the compost bins and rubbish bins in and i loved them, they were only ever trimed twice a year and they made a lovely dense hedge in a very nice lime green colour.
    Now i wnat them to hide a train track! I hate the sight iof the horrible chain fences never mind the trains. :(
     
  8. good digger

    good digger Gardener

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    You could use some nice ivy there are many lovely ones on the market these days.
     
  9. Fran

    Fran Gardener

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    wkdwhite - now that is one time I would consider leylandii, depending on the suns directions, both to hid the tracks if yuo don't like them, but also to reduce sound. However I would container grow them to ensure I coulc still use the soil and keep them to only the height you need.
     
  10. geoffhandley

    geoffhandley Gardener

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    Beech is nicer. It grows fast and looks prettier all year round. Also has the advantage that you can keep the hedge quite narrow but tall and will still provide a dense screen. Get Leylandii up to about 6 feet and you have a pretty thick hedge which is a nightmare to cut.
    You can also sweep up the fallen beech leaves and rot them down in a corner. Makes the best leaf mould which is really useful round the garden.
     
  11. tig

    tig Gardener

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    im in the process of removing around 30 of them, theyre about 30ft high and 8-10ft wide. cant stand them. they lose their bottom branches as they get older and get unsightly along with everything mentioned above. if you come and take mine away you can have all the cuttings and seed you want :D :D :D
     
  12. geoffhandley

    geoffhandley Gardener

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    Have you seen where people cut into them from the sides and don't realise that you cannot cut back into old wood on conifers? - they then get this horrible dead appearance forever
     
  13. pete

    pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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    I'm gonna add my usual suggestion here YEW, its not that slow and its easy to trim, plus if it should get out of hand yew can cut it back hard as yew like. Its evergreen and comes in gold or green.
    And yew wont upset the railway with leaves on the line.
    But if you like leylandii and have been put off there are other cypress like trees that are slower growing, best to have a word with a hedging supplyer.
     
  14. Fran

    Fran Gardener

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    Not I like that idea Pete - I never really consider yew, but I should - having seen it in many old and grand gardens, as well as church yards. - its only downside, are the berries are best not chewed as the seed is poisonous as I recall.
     
  15. Hornbeam

    Hornbeam Gardener

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    Agree with Pete. Contrary to what most people believe, yew is a fast grower when young and it can be hard pruned and shaped and always looks good. Never gets that brown, dead, leggy look that conifers get. And of course, yew isn't a conifer. It is a flowering, fruit bearing evergreen native. Birds love the red fruit though the seeds and all other parts are poisonous
     
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