Lychnis Coronaria

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by PeterS, Mar 30, 2006.

  1. PeterS

    PeterS Total Gardener

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    With such a lovely day, I started some tidying up in the garden. I grew some Lychnis Coronaria from seed and it flowered well last year. But its lower stems lost their leaves and look bad even when it was in flower, so I moved it to the back of the border last year after it flowered.

    The plants have green leaves showing, though it is not clear if it is this year's growth or last year's. But on tidying up, the roots felt very brittle as if the plant was dead. Is this normal? I don't see how they can be dead with green leaves.
     
  2. UsedtobeDendy

    UsedtobeDendy Gardener

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    I've just been looking it up, and it seems it's a biennial - could that be the answer? I've seen this sort of thing with evening primrose and other biennials, after their 2nd year, the seem to be still alive, but really, you're wasting your time. I'd say, if the roots are brittle, there's not much point - start again! http://kikki.celtic-twilight.com/biennial/lychnis.htm
     
  3. Waco

    Waco Gardener

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    Morning Peter, I have loads of the dark pinky red one, it just seeds itself about quite happily and appers and disappears where it feels like doind so.
    It ofter appears later in the season though so don't give up on it. Have to say that leaves are grey not green oh and when it loosk dead at the end of the season I just pull it up and compost it.

    Thanks for your advise on Pleone - very interesting that they say its pink - the little one I have is from yellow stock, perhaps thats why it was so expensive.
     
  4. PeterS

    PeterS Total Gardener

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    Thank you both. Yes the sights I have looked at do say it is short lived. I am going to assume it is an opportunity to grow something new. It was such a nice day yesterday that I started weeding - consequently all seedlings in that area have gone to heaven. I can cross that off my list now - only 217,456,197 more plants left to try - I had better get a move on. :D
     
  5. Waco

    Waco Gardener

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    I bet you in July it just pops up somewhere quite unexpected. I don't think I even planted any in first place, I think birds just brought it in.
     
  6. rosietutu

    rosietutu Gardener

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    Oh that is what its proper name is..Campion
    we have it growing wild in the layby on the Wimborne bypass in fact thought I might half inch some seeds last year then forgot. :D :D
     
  7. Liz

    Liz Gardener

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    If it likes its' conditions it will self-seed; so after 3 years you should have continuous flowers!
     
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