Metal Shed

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Paladin, Apr 3, 2013.

  1. Paladin

    Paladin Gardening...A work of Heart

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    Mrs Pal and I built this at the weekend for a log store.
    I just wish I had asked for feedback about the product because it turns the metal is paper thin and easily buckles. I will now have to reinforce the walls to stop the weight of the logs bending the walls.
    It's fixed to the patio and has had plenty of silicone applied to all joints but only the Lord knows if it will with stand high winds:dunno:
    Any horror stories folks?
     
  2. Marley Farley

    Marley Farley Affable Admin! Staff Member

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    Hmmm a friend down the lane has one.. He says it is great & watertight & has never tried to take off... :help:
    He also was disappointed with the gauge metal & he also had/has a few problems with the sliding doors now & then, but he has never had mice in there & his tools are all very dry & happy as far as he knows... ;) :heehee:
    I think I would build yourself a wooden reinforcement.. He has thick ply around the lower half of his which also strengthens it up loads..
     
  3. rustyroots

    rustyroots Total Gardener

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    I have a very similar one from Argos. I have had it 3 years with no problems. I too had a nightmare putting it up it took 3 days mine is the 10' x 12'. I have lined the inside off mine with 3mm ply and it has with stood me clattering it with tools etc. I am quite pleased overall.

    Rusty
     
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    • Sheal

      Sheal Total Gardener

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      I've heard you can get condensation inside during hot weather.
       
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      • rustyroots

        rustyroots Total Gardener

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        I have never had any in mine, but then again we haven't had much hot weather in recent times.

        Rusty
         
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        • JWK

          JWK Gardener

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          I've had one for about 5 years now, it took me + son twice as long to put up compared to what the instructions claimed (8 hrs instead of 4). Getting it all square was impossible so we had to modify (i.e. drill) the final few panels to get them to fit. I don't like the paper thin metal panels, next door's kids kicking a football makes big dents, though the dents do spring back into shape with a gentle push.

          The worst thing is the condensation over winter, it drips off the cold inside roof, so everything stored inside has to be covered in plastic sheets. I can't keep tools in there, they would rust plus it's not secure.

          I wish I had spent a bit more and bought a wooden shed.
           
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          • Kristen

            Kristen Under gardener

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            I had a metal shed like that, sold it on eBay. Took the guys that came to collect it HOURS to dismantle it

            I have a nice wooden barn :) but with a metal corrugated roof :( The condensation falls like rain on cold nights (that will be the case for any metal sheeting - such a good conductor that it will act as a very effective cold-bridge if the inside is at all warmer than the outside.)
             
          • Dan Dollin

            Dan Dollin Gardener

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            Looks neat and tidy and in a sheltered corner. I'm sure it'll be fine.

            The thin metal isn't great, but on the other hand they are cheap and light. Imagine how heavy it would be if the panels were twice as thick. I think they serve a purpose, great in a garden etc. But I wouldn't store tools it in if it were in a publicly accessible space.

            Our neighbours use one as a field shelter for their sheep. The other day they were scrapping and one went straight through the side of the thing and has buckled it all to hell. The sheep don't seem to mind their new window though!

            If you're concerned about condensation then a roof vent is a good idea, you can get clever solar powered ones... great to stop it being an oven in the summer and will move out any moist air.
            Alternatively (too late for you now) the plastic double skin sheds are very good and in theory will never rot. They will buckle if any pressure applied to the sides or roof though other than their own weight.
             
          • shiney

            shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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            I suppose it depends on the make of shed. We have had ours nearly 7 years with no trouble. The metal is fairly sturdy with a lot of horizontal panels (not the verticals you have) and no hint of condensation.

            It was half the price of a wooden one of equivalent size (I think it's approx 10' x 13') and took two men eight hours to put up.

            185_8503.JPG
             
          • deb pocky

            deb pocky Gardener

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            love the shed - can i be cheeky and ask where it was from and how much it cost. we are looking at alternatives to wooden one and need a big one - what is the biggest they do?
             
          • shiney

            shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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            The shed is a Yardmaster, made in Northern Ireland. Ours was approx 10ft x 13ft but I can't see that size in the current catalogue but GardenBuildingsDirect (there are other sellers as well :heehee:) show one that size at £470.

            Their catalogue is here:
            http://yardmaster.co.uk/pdf/ymeng.pdf

            Here is an ad for the shed
            http://www.gardenbuildingsdirect.co.uk/Metal-Sheds/Yardmaster-SL-Shiplap-Metal-Shed

            I seem to remember that it worked out at about half the cost of a wooden shed but there is a lot more work involved in erecting it. The assembly instructions are very clear but the booklet is 24 pages of A4.

            You'll need to make a base for it (slab or paving) and you would be better off making a floor. I made my floor out of marine ply (got it cheap) and covered it with some old lino. I also made a wooden ramp to put down when getting the mower out as you have the metal frame all round. As long as you get the whole thing square you shouldn't have any problem with the doors which ar sliding doors on an overhead runner. The couple of translucent panels in the roof give plenty of light (no windows). There is no maintenance needed :dbgrtmb:

            I've never had any problem with the shed and it does the job it was bought for - keeping the field rats out!!! They ate holes in walls and floors of the two wooden sheds.
             
          • pamsdish

            pamsdish Total Gardener

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            We or I now, bought our shed 10x13 approx, in 2003, we dismantled it and re-erected it when we moved 2007, it is fiddly to do but worth it, as shed is still good.We put down slabs as a quick fix and they are fine, however they do get damp from soaking up water from ground. I have shelves down one side my husband made from pallets, and more pallets on the floor with, stuff, stacked on I also have an ancient metal cabin trunk at the back I put large soft items in.
             
          • shiney

            shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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            I overcame, unwittingly, the possible problem of damp on the paving by having it raised. This was done because the ground was sloping so it needed to be levelled. I'd recommend it in order to get round any damp problem.

            I also have shelving but, as it's not easy to fix to the walls, I bought some cheap, freestanding, racking shelving.

            As Pam has shown :blue thumb: , it's not difficult to get round problems with a little bit of thought.
             
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