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Neighbours gardens.

Discussion in 'Gardening Discussions' started by Who am I?, Jun 13, 2019.

  1. Who am I?

    Who am I? Gardener

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    Do you trim your neighbours plants back from your border because they impinge on your territory or use them as part of your plant scheme?
     
  2. redstar

    redstar Total Gardener

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    Nope, but we did put up a fence to keep their leaves from blowing on to our property, and if any of their trees drop limbs on to my lawn I toss it back where it belongs. but no trimming.
     
  3. Verdun

    Verdun Passionate gardener

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    I do both Who am I?:) According to my own whim I guess.
    I also have distance views of high hills on the Towans .......no need to trim anything there:)
    One neighbour has a huge ceanothus in his garden and I can enjoy that behind my own shrubs. He also has plants near my wall that I do not hesitate to prune back :)
     
  4. Alisa

    Alisa Gardener

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    I cut ivies back. And chop away branches overhanging. Actually neighbour mentioned that we can do it. And neighbours are on the north. I think our city gardens are not big enough to tolerate tall and wide neighbours' trees.
     
  5. Enfield Steve

    Enfield Steve Gardener

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    Don't get me started on the neighbours over hangs.... arghhhhhhh!!!!
     
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    • Doghouse Riley

      Doghouse Riley Head Gardener

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      If you want to see "overhang," take a look at next door's trees.

      P1020841.JPG

      I keep them under control with my Barnel telescopic pruner for thin branches and a Fiskars cord operated pruner for heavier branches, to which I've attached an extension.

      I can get at part of them by standing on the tea-house roof at one end and on the "rabbit shed" at the other.

      For the middle bit I put a ladder up against the fence and reach up from there.

      That's the best part of a hundred and seventy quid's worth of gear I need to control a problem of someone else's making. You'd think ending up with several "half trees" would give them the hint, but no luck.

      P1020765.JPG


      To have that size of tree in a suburban garden is completely anti-social,
       
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        Last edited: Jun 14, 2019
      • wiseowl

        wiseowl Friendly Owl ADMIN Staff Member

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        Hello everyone I have 100 feet of this to trim and shred every year,but its worth it for the superb scent that drifts everywhere,anyway my neighbours are both in their late 60's (a lot younger than Woo)and cannot manage it:smile:

        P1310877.JPG
         
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        • Clare G

          Clare G Super Gardener

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          A bit of both; some plants I can just enjoy, others I have to cut back. Relations with the neighbours are very amicable but we do have a problem at the end of the garden, where one set have a huge squeezed-in holly next to the fence and overhanging my side. The top is leaning horribly now too, and it has bare areas which to me suggest it's developing holly leaf blight, like the one in my own garden I recently had taken out. Really it would be better to take this one out too, but we have compromised on Mr Neighbour cutting it back after they return from holiday. Which I am grateful for, as the branches are too high for me to reach, but nevertheless I fear this will only be a short-term solution!
           
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          • andrews

            andrews Super Gardener

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            We don't have much intruding into our garden. The in-laws live in our annexe and they have clematis montana growing up trellis which comes over the top of our fence. I know its well loved but it isn't one for me. We trim this back.

            The only other intrusion is from the other neighbours who have a passion flower. I think we (or rather our chickens) get a better display than our neighbours as it winds its way through the native hedging in the paddock. Last year it was stunning - so good that we've now planted one in our garden. We leave this to do its thing until the hedge is pruned in autumn.
             
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            • Sian in Belgium

              Sian in Belgium Total Gardener

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              It’s all in the eye of the beholder, I guess @Doghouse Riley.

              In our house in the UK, we had a number of large trees, including a 200 year old horse chestnut tree in the corner of the garden, which was the last in a line of old estate trees. When we left, the council was considering putting a TPO on it. No one complained about it, instead we all enjoyed it, and the wildlife it supported.

              I think it’s all a matter of location. One neighbour in our current house has allowed a seedling sycamore to grow on the boundary. Its branches are rubbing against the windows of our house. Now THAT is too close, and we are currently negotiating it being felled. Garden designers often refer to “borrowing” the surrounding trees in your garden design.
               
            • andrews

              andrews Super Gardener

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              Just remembered this one.

              When we moved into the house there was a chain link fence along the side of the road. The pavement on the left was put in place to make a pinch point / single file road as the road was not really wide enough for two cars.
              There was virginia creeper along this fence which was fairly vigorous and would grow through the chain link.
              We had a letter from the local council to cut the plant back as it was on the pavement. It wasn't on the pavement and the left side wasn't really intended as pavement. Needless to say, the creeper went, along with the chain link fence.

              Capture.JPG
               
            • Doghouse Riley

              Doghouse Riley Head Gardener

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              Well... "Each to their own."

              This "beholder" gets sick of vaccing up all the catkins in the Spring and the leaves in the Autumn.
              Before that he was sick of the huge cherry tree and the bin fulls of blossom I was having to collect each year. The tree was up against the previous chain-link fence I put up. Because they can't be arsed to water their garden and I can be bothered to regularly water mine, the main tap root grew under the old fence and caused our small patio to "heave." So I took it all up and dug down, found the tap root and took a chain saw to it, four feet inside our property. Then filled in the hole and re-laid the patio.

              The tree died. But they'd already planted those here now.

              Presently, our wisteria is supported on wires stretched between the concrete fence posts, nothing is attached to the fence panels. I'm constantly spraying weekiller on the bits of climber of theirs that grow through the fence. When the panels which are slowly getting "eaten away" by this creeper need replacing, they'll lose everything growing up their side of this fence I errected.
               
            • Jenny namaste

              Jenny namaste Total Gardener

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              I have a postsge stamp sized garden and most of the stuff we all grow is necessarily petite sized. The dreaded ground elder is surreptitiously invading ever Westwards and invasive Houttiana from next door keeps appearing in the border. I loathe its odour with a passion - makes me heave...
              :paladin:
              Jenny
               
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              • BigC

                BigC Super Gardener

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                @Doghouse Riley
                I wouldn't mind your Wisteria overhanging into MY garden lol

                My neighbour butchered my Honeysuckle (American Beauty) last year it was well over 10yrs old and he threw it back over my fence damaging other plants in the process. Now his Buddleia is encroaching over my fence do I take the nippers to it..Nah, I kinda like it actually, Light Mauve and compact...but anyway this is a joint fence that I paint every year out of my own pocket, his side and mine...If he had of told me I would have gone around and pruned the Honeysuckle properly instead of murdering it. Well, I have news for him it's making a comeback, :rasp: Guess he might have to buy his own paint next season.

                IMG_2047.jpg
                 
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                  Last edited: Jul 5, 2019
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