New Japanese maple - Osakasuki

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Hazel Twigg, Oct 25, 2020.

  1. Hazel Twigg

    Hazel Twigg Apprentice Gardener

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    I have bought a Acer Palmatum Osakasuki which will arrive tomorrow. I'm sort of regretting this now as I've read all the posts regarding problems with Japanese Maples.
    I live in Central Scotland and this may wrong time of year to be planting out as we are experiencing a lot of wind and rain right now. I intend to pot this with some John Innes no. 3 and will leave pot to overwinter in a fairly sheltered south/west facing spot. Not much confidence in all this as I am concerned it won't survive - any suggestions?
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2020
  2. Perki

    Perki Total Gardener

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    Hi hazel, Acer are bone hardy in this country and will survive a Scottish winter easy, they may be slight damage to the ends of the wood which hasn't matured enough which is common throughout the country. Now and Spring is the best time to be planting out most plants especially trees - shrubs . A few problems you may of come across are leaf scorch either from the sun or cold winds which isn't a problem over the winter months, I wouldn't worry to much about sun scorch living in Scotland I see plenty here in full sun with little to no damage . cold winds maybe a problem but as you say its in a sheltered position so hopefully that wont be a problem . A problem you may have is it being in a pot like all plants in pots they require watering, the lack of water can result in a crispy edge around the leaf which is commonly confused with sun / cold damage , they don't like waterlogged condition so only water when it be dry / hot you'll get enough rain most of the time.

    How big is the plant you are getting and what size of pot is it going into?

    Can I make another suggestion , you are rightly using John innes no3 mix this with ericaceous compost 50% - 50% or more JI two thirds if you wish . Not only will the pot have better drainage but also retain moister when needs , and free / easier run for the roots to develop JInns can get quite solid when it settles . Also the acer will develop better autumn colours with ericaceous compost and it will be lighter to move the pot around .
     
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      Last edited: Oct 25, 2020
    • Hazel Twigg

      Hazel Twigg Apprentice Gardener

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      Its arriving in a 7cm pot and re-potting to 24cm dia pot. Good tip for 50/50 John Innes 3 and ericaceous compost. I've been meaning to purchase some ericaceous compost for my Daboecia cantabrica.
      My confidence in this plant's survival has improved and I thank you for your advice.
       
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      • alicia

        alicia Apprentice Gardener

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        It's only a cutting then. That's too big a pot to move it into.
         
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        • Hazel Twigg

          Hazel Twigg Apprentice Gardener

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          OK I have smaller pots. Might keep it in hallway for a little while and harden off before placing outside.
           
        • Hazel Twigg

          Hazel Twigg Apprentice Gardener

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          I have read that a larger pot is more effective in protecting perennials from frost due to the more soil surrounding the roots. Im transferring from a 7cm pot - can I use a 24cm pot?
           
        • alicia

          alicia Apprentice Gardener

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          Its not a perennial tho. Its a shrub, and the fine roots can be damaged sitting in wet soil for too long. Thats why you don't put them in big pots too quickly.
           
        • Perki

          Perki Total Gardener

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          Yes it would protect the plant better from frost, but as alicia has mentioned when you pot on into a large pot from the off set the plant tends to just sit in wet cold compost throughout winter ending in its demise, and if it does survive it takes longer to establish it's self . Best to pot on into a 1 to 2 litre pot as long as the acer has already filled its original pot or you could do this in spring, leave it in a protected place over winter cold greenhouse / cold frame / porch or even next to the house ( not the house or anywhere to warm ) . If you are worried about protecting it from cold wrap some bubble wrap around the pot but make sure you don't cover the drainage holes .
           
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          • Hazel Twigg

            Hazel Twigg Apprentice Gardener

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            Thanks for your advice - i will do this. I have already potted it into a slightly bigger pot as it was a bit rootbound when it arrived. I will leave next to the doorstep in the south/west aspect as it may be more sheltered there. I take in my society garlic at nights when frost is forecast and may do same with this. Heating is off in the hallway. Cheers.
             
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