Passiflora and other "exotic" climbers

Discussion in 'Tropical Gardening' started by longk, Dec 21, 2015.

  1. longk

    longk Total Gardener

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2011
    Messages:
    11,362
    Location:
    Oxfordshire
    Ratings:
    +23,031
    I'll start this thread off with the Passiflora as I've decided that next year I am going to start a small Passiflora collection. So far it extends to P.antioquensis................
    [​IMG]

    "Amethyst"................
    [​IMG]

    I also have a small bog standard Passiflora caerulea and a small P.incarnata. Also, I may have seeds for P.umbilicata coming from the States..............
    [​IMG]

    (read more here)

    What have you got or grown in the past (please feel free to post photos) and any recommendations (especially for hardier forms).
     
    • Like Like x 6
    • Anthony Rogers

      Anthony Rogers Guest

      Ratings:
      +0
      Hi Longk,

      The one I've grown this year is Rhodochiton and I've loved it. I've saved the seeds off it for next year and also given it a bit of a prune back. It's now growing nicely again.

      The one I'd like to try next year is the Spanish Flag, Mina Lobata. I'd also like to get some Ecremocarpus Scaber.
       
      • Like Like x 1
      • Informative Informative x 1
      • NigelJ

        NigelJ Total Gardener

        Joined:
        Jan 31, 2012
        Messages:
        4,551
        Gender:
        Male
        Occupation:
        Mad Scientist
        Location:
        Paignton Devon
        Ratings:
        +15,948
        I've grown Mina lobata for a couple of years and I find it needs a good summer to do well here in Devon. I grow Eccremocarpus scaber; once established it seems to be hardier than many people think. I've seen it growing happily outside in Lincolnshire. @Anthony Rogers I may have some seed if you are interested.
        Dicentra scandens (now Dactylicapnos scandens) is a hardy perennial here coming back every spring then growing and flowering well.
        D
         
        • Like Like x 1
        • Friendly Friendly x 1
        • shiney

          shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

          Joined:
          Jul 3, 2006
          Messages:
          54,955
          Gender:
          Male
          Occupation:
          Retired - Last Century!!!
          Location:
          Herts/Essex border. Zone 8b
          Ratings:
          +102,785
          We have a bog standard caerulea that does a wonderful job. We do nothing to it, apart from prune it back each winter, and it spreads a good 20ft to left and right each summer. It gives us hundreds of blooms and a lot of fruit (not really edible).

          P1240436.JPG

          P1210058.JPG

          P1240437.JPG

          P1250873.JPG

          Mina Lobata grows like wildfire here

          P1250571.JPG

          Seeds sown in May, planted out in June and this by early October - covering 18ft of fence.

          P1250961.JPG

          Cobaea scandens also grew like mad.
           
          • Like Like x 8
          • pete

            pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

            Joined:
            Jan 9, 2005
            Messages:
            39,303
            Gender:
            Male
            Occupation:
            Retired
            Location:
            Mid Kent
            Ratings:
            +61,217
            Grown a few passifloras over the years, my favourite is P. alata, but dont really have the space for that so much these days, being that I found it did best kept fairly warm in winter.
            Still got a few on the go these days though, mostly only if they can stand frost or min of 0 C.

            One I really like is a P. anastasia, quite large red flowers, spends summer outside.
            DSC_0104.JPG

            P. XBellotti is another large flowered hybrid. Not really fost hardy, but grows in cool greenhouse. Its also scented.
            DSC_0005.JPG

            Purple haze is a nice flower, but I find the flowers a bit sparse.
            DSC_0109.JPG

            Pretty hardy and close to P. cerulea is contance elliot, survived -3 C up to now.
            DSC_0031.JPG

            P. white lightning appears fairly hardy, but I prefer cerulea.
            DSC_0103.JPG
            P. victoria is in my greenhouse, growing basically as a weed, but I like it, so it stays.
            DSC_0017.JPG
            I did have a plant of P. racemosa some years ago that I wish I still had, it flowered mainly in winter, but the red flowers were held in clusters on the old wood.
            Also grew P. manicata, but could not get flower buds until autumn, being a cool grower. By that time it was always too large to over winter without cutting back.
             
            • Like Like x 6
            • Ian Taylor

              Ian Taylor Total Gardener

              Joined:
              Nov 1, 2013
              Messages:
              2,228
              Gender:
              Male
              Occupation:
              Maintenance Manager, Oddfellows on the Park.
              Location:
              Cheadle Hulme
              Ratings:
              +2,751
              I'm going to have to try and grow some Passsiflora next year, is it easy from seed or buy the plant ?
              Fantastic photos everyone, not sure how they would over winter in the North West
               
              • Like Like x 2
              • Sirius

                Sirius Total Gardener

                Joined:
                Jun 26, 2012
                Messages:
                1,402
                Gender:
                Male
                Location:
                Hertfordshire
                Ratings:
                +1,195
                Longk,

                I had a "thing" for Passiflora some time ago.
                Managed to track down some of the rarer tropical species.
                But their maintenance is difficult - the need for constant warmth and humidity and I sadly lost them over a period of time.

                I now just have a caerulea in the garden.
                 
                • Agree Agree x 2
                • Like Like x 1
                • Informative Informative x 1
                • longk

                  longk Total Gardener

                  Joined:
                  Nov 24, 2011
                  Messages:
                  11,362
                  Location:
                  Oxfordshire
                  Ratings:
                  +23,031
                  Thanks for the replies chaps!

                  I've never overwintered this (or rather never put any effort into overwintering it) for no reason other than I find it so easy from seed. I'm interested to see the results now.

                  I consider the pure species (as opposed to the Tresco hybrids) to be fully hardy here in the Cotswolds too.

                  I've germinated seeds of this many times but always lose them through neglect when they're young seedlings. I will deffo try again though.

                  If the fruit matures the juice does make good ice cream and sorbets.

                  You're not kidding! Not a plant that I've had much joy with and yours embarrasses me no end!

                  I grew that one a few years ago as well. Like you I found it got too big and gave it away.

                  That is a beauty Pete!

                  P.antioquensis is similar. We then grew it in a fair bit of shade and found it would bloom from early September until the first frost.

                  Common species/cultivars are so readily available that I just buy the plants. The common ones are perfectly hardy here and we see some of the coldest overnight temperatures quite often.

                  I am more interested in some of the higher altitude
                  species when it comes to the rarer species. Having said that my heart will probably rule my head :heehee:
                   
                  • Like Like x 2
                  • NigelJ

                    NigelJ Total Gardener

                    Joined:
                    Jan 31, 2012
                    Messages:
                    4,551
                    Gender:
                    Male
                    Occupation:
                    Mad Scientist
                    Location:
                    Paignton Devon
                    Ratings:
                    +15,948
                    • Informative Informative x 2
                    • Like Like x 1
                    • Agree Agree x 1
                    • shiney

                      shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

                      Joined:
                      Jul 3, 2006
                      Messages:
                      54,955
                      Gender:
                      Male
                      Occupation:
                      Retired - Last Century!!!
                      Location:
                      Herts/Essex border. Zone 8b
                      Ratings:
                      +102,785
                      We didn't do anything special. It got planted in the new bed, where we removed 22 Leylandii in early Spring, and all we did was dug in compost and horse manure, stuck the plants in the ground (grew them from seed in 3" pots) and left them to their own devices (apart from watering when dry).
                       
                      • Like Like x 3
                      • longk

                        longk Total Gardener

                        Joined:
                        Nov 24, 2011
                        Messages:
                        11,362
                        Location:
                        Oxfordshire
                        Ratings:
                        +23,031
                        • Informative Informative x 1
                        • pete

                          pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

                          Joined:
                          Jan 9, 2005
                          Messages:
                          39,303
                          Gender:
                          Male
                          Occupation:
                          Retired
                          Location:
                          Mid Kent
                          Ratings:
                          +61,217
                          Not really sure you can have a small collection of Passiflora.:biggrin:
                          I find space is always the biggest problem, and cutting back just stops them flowering.

                          A plant I like, which is not really a climber, more a shrub that can be tied to a support for summer flowering and cut hard back in winter when dormant.
                          Podranea ricasoliana. Still working on how hardy it is, but I only needs minimum heat/protection.
                          DSC_0100.JPG

                          And I'm still working out how hardy Bougainvillea actually is, I'm protecting the root area and lower branches from frost, but the upper branches survived last winter with just a little die back.
                          Its on a west facing wall.
                          DSC_0049.JPG

                          Good old Campsis, this is "indian summer"
                          DSC_0060.JPG
                           
                          • Like Like x 7
                          • longk

                            longk Total Gardener

                            Joined:
                            Nov 24, 2011
                            Messages:
                            11,362
                            Location:
                            Oxfordshire
                            Ratings:
                            +23,031
                            I rather like that but I suspect that here it would need a conservatory. I could be wrong - I have grown its relative Pandorea jasminoides successfully by keeping it frost free but that croaked when it got frosted.
                            [​IMG]

                            Are you saying that it stayed in the green?

                            One that bombed repeatedly here! No probs with hardiness but they rarely start growing before June. I've had buds a few times but they're so late that the frost gets them.

                            One thing that I do have thanks to @PeterS is Mucuna sempervirens..................
                            [​IMG]

                            (photo borrowed from this page)
                            It blooms in the spring on the previous years growth so we'll soon see if I've been successful!

                            The following are not exotic or tropical but they are not often grown and certainly more eye-catching than their common sweet pea relatives;
                            Lathyrus sativus azureus.................
                            [​IMG]

                            [​IMG]

                            Lablab purpureus..............
                            [​IMG]

                            Caiophora hibiscifolia is a pretty rare tender climber here in the UK................
                            [​IMG]

                            [​IMG]

                            Thunbergia gregorii will survive a few degrees of frost if there is enough woody growth for it to reshoot from................
                            [​IMG]

                            [​IMG]

                            Bomarea edulis is a rampant hardy climber to grow through early flowering shrubs..............
                            [​IMG]

                            [​IMG]
                             
                            • Like Like x 8
                            • pete

                              pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

                              Joined:
                              Jan 9, 2005
                              Messages:
                              39,303
                              Gender:
                              Male
                              Occupation:
                              Retired
                              Location:
                              Mid Kent
                              Ratings:
                              +61,217
                               
                              • Like Like x 2
                              • longk

                                longk Total Gardener

                                Joined:
                                Nov 24, 2011
                                Messages:
                                11,362
                                Location:
                                Oxfordshire
                                Ratings:
                                +23,031
                                @pete - although we're in the south we're also a long way inland. Check the overnight lows at Brize Norton (five miles away as the crow flies) and you'll see it is frequently the coldest or close (in an average winter) on quite a regular basis.
                                 
                                • Informative Informative x 2
                                Loading...

                                Share This Page

                                1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
                                  By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
                                  Dismiss Notice