pay theElectric,rates etc

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by Purple Streaks, Jun 16, 2021.

  1. Purple Streaks

    Purple Streaks Gardener

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    Sadly I I will shortly be an executor for my mum.
    I know the solicitor will guide me .
    ,But I can not work out
    something that is worrying me, it's the bills .

    if it takes a couple of years to tie her estate up do I continue to pay all t the bills as normal and claim back this money when it is all sorted ????
     
  2. CanadianLori

    CanadianLori Total Gardener

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    As executor, you have the power to administer funds to keep things flowing. Your solicitor will guide you. But keep control of things. And vigilant. It is up to you to make sure that her estate stays with you, intact.

    :grphg: not a pleasant time and please catch this hug. I mean it. We here at GC are thinking of you. :sad:

    EDIT: yes, charge the expenses to the estate and compensate yourself. Be careful to keep receipts and all paperwork communications. So easy these days with emails and other ways to store data. Don't delete anything. Just save until later. Data doesn't take up drawer space. Yes, tedious to go through later on but still there to sift through.

    Hugs. Lori.
     
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      Last edited: Jun 17, 2021
    • JWK

      JWK Gardener Staff Member

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      Agree with Lori. You should be able to access your Mum's bank account by taking along the death certificate so that you can pay bills. If there isn't enough in the account you have to find the money yourself and claim it all back. Don't forget to keep up house insurance too.

      There is an excellent Which? book about what to do when someone dies.
       
    • JWK

      JWK Gardener Staff Member

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      You may be able to reduce the Council tax liability if the property is unoccupied.
       
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      • Scrungee

        Scrungee Well known for it

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        + Notify them if the property is now unoccupied.
         
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        • ricky101

          ricky101 Total Gardener

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          It should only take a couple of months to sort out a simple estate, its generally the selling of the house that can take some time, if applicable.

          You can do Probate yourself if there is not any major complications, but if using a solisitor do ask around to try and find one who is good as some can be next to useless as we have just found out after our local good one had been taken over by a larger group.

          When the time comes phone up all the service providers to let them know, they will still send the bills to your mothers house but basically you pay them from your own account as your mothers bank account will probably be frozen.

          As others have said keep all the receipts , so if you are not the sole beneficiary you will have to show the others the amounts you have had to spend winding up the estate including funeral and solicitors costs than ywill be deducted from the Estate before distributing.

          Best advice, do not panic when the time comes, just ensure your mothers property is secure and remove the any really valuable items and key paperwork, everything else can be then done in your own time in the following weeks.
           
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          • JWK

            JWK Gardener Staff Member

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            Now I remember when my late Dad's bungalow was unoccupied the existing insurance company would not insure it. I had to find another company who would insure and they stipulated the letter box had to be sealed, it wasn't straightforward, but that was after it was unoccupied for months.
             
          • shiney

            shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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            I agree with all of the above.

            If you are the executor then you can deal with the probate. From what you are saying, you already have a solicitor and they will be able to tell you if you can have the probate and how to go about it.

            Once you have probate you can operate the bank account and pay the bills. You should be able to get a reduction of 50% on the council tax (unless they have changed the rules) for six months.

            Dealing with the estate is usually quite easy and the solicitor will handle the sale of the house. If there are a number of beneficiaries you will need to keep full account of monies in and out (not difficult).

            Turn off gas and electric unless necessary for safety. Cancel any TV contracts and phone (unless you want to keep the phone on. Same with internet if she had one.
             
          • Scrungee

            Scrungee Well known for it

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            Probate is taking a very long time at the moment, the executors of a neighbour have been waiting for 6 months.
             
          • shiney

            shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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            I would guess that may be because you can't make direct approaches to the court at the moment. As things relax it may be possible to go direct. Usually doing it through a solicitor takes longer because they won't be chasing the court every couple of days.

            Pre Covid I used to turn up at the court to hurry things up. :noidea:

            The quickest I got probate was two weeks but generally it took about a month to six weeks.
             
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            • Scrungee

              Scrungee Well known for it

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              I remember sorting out vehicle ownership with DVLA was a PITA, and that was pre-Covid.

              There were already delays pre-Covid.
               
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              • shiney

                shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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                I admit it was easier for me as the County Court was in the same building as my work. I went in there every day to ask how it was going. :heehee:
                 
              • Loofah

                Loofah Well used member Staff Member

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                I'm doing my late uncle's estate now and estimate of probate is 9-12 months, letting the solicitors do everything .
                 
              • JWK

                JWK Gardener Staff Member

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                You don't always need Probate, it depends on the size of the estate and if assets were jointly owned. Your solicitor will help determine this if you are not sure. With my late Dad we didn't need probate to access the bank account to keep up payments for electric, gas etc.
                 
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                • shiney

                  shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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                  I did the same for my father by just presenting the death certificate to the bank and they authorised the payments.
                   
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