Planting Heathers

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by SimonZ, Oct 11, 2020.

  1. SimonZ

    SimonZ Gardener

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    824
    Ratings:
    +646
    As mentioned elsewhere on this site, 2020 has largely been a dead duck for me in gardening terms. I am thinking of one last-ditch effort, though. The supermarket are selling off heathers, and as they are so suited to this climate and my soil I'm considering buying a few and planting them. Although I know heather can be planted in autumn, I've only ever planted them in spring, so wondered if I should bear anything in mind while doing so. As we head into mid October, is it still a good time of year to plant? The terrain is slopey and rocky, with an acidic soil, but the climate very wet.
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
    • Mike Allen

      Mike Allen Total Gardener

      Joined:
      Jan 4, 2014
      Messages:
      2,385
      Gender:
      Male
      Occupation:
      Retired. Plant Pathologist.
      Location:
      Eltham. SE. London
      Ratings:
      +4,643
      One advantage of buying plants is, they are usuall in pots and thus can be planted out at any time, taking into concideration a few advisory points.
       
    • pete

      pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

      Joined:
      Jan 9, 2005
      Messages:
      30,947
      Gender:
      Male
      Occupation:
      joinery
      Location:
      Mid Kent
      Ratings:
      +36,620
      I'd say autumn is probably the best time to plant most hardy plants, heather included.
      I think acidic soil means you can have the best of the bunch.
       
      • Friendly Friendly x 1
      • SimonZ

        SimonZ Gardener

        Joined:
        Feb 9, 2009
        Messages:
        824
        Ratings:
        +646
        Thanks to both responding. I'm thinking of getting them today and due to my schedule will have to plant either this afternoon or tomorrow afternoon. I can't see that being much of a problem, but would anyone recommend I wait until I can plant them on a morning?
         
      • pete

        pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

        Joined:
        Jan 9, 2005
        Messages:
        30,947
        Gender:
        Male
        Occupation:
        joinery
        Location:
        Mid Kent
        Ratings:
        +36,620
        Why is that Simon?
        Morning afternoon, I dont think they will be bothered.;)

        Unless you know something I dont:scratch::smile:
         
      • SimonZ

        SimonZ Gardener

        Joined:
        Feb 9, 2009
        Messages:
        824
        Ratings:
        +646
        Just what I've long done based on something covered in a horticulture course I did many years ago. The general gist was that its usually best to plant most plants in the late morning or late afternoon so as to give them more time to settle out of the stronger sunlight of morning or noon, but maximise the daylight hours rather than them being plunged into the cold night too soon. I prefer mornings as the soil is going to be warmer for longer. However, I think the above is a detail really, and I doubt most people really worry too much about the time of day for planting.
         
        • Informative Informative x 1
        • Mike Allen

          Mike Allen Total Gardener

          Joined:
          Jan 4, 2014
          Messages:
          2,385
          Gender:
          Male
          Occupation:
          Retired. Plant Pathologist.
          Location:
          Eltham. SE. London
          Ratings:
          +4,643
          Yes. Autumn is generally considered the time to plant hardy perennials. Reason being, many are entering into their dormancy state. This is when the sap decends and the nourishment to call it such returns to the roots. The one time planting of anything is held back is, during winter and when/if the ground is frozen.

          Potted or container grown plants, have endured some time in a soil enviroment to which they have become accustomed to. To plat with the growing medium intact causes very little if any damage or shock to the roots. When planting, it is good to have a hole slightly large than the rootball, gently tease some of the roots loose and add soil/compost to fill in. The roots will soon find their way into this new medium.
           
        • SimonZ

          SimonZ Gardener

          Joined:
          Feb 9, 2009
          Messages:
          824
          Ratings:
          +646
          Thanks Mike.
           
        Loading...

        Share This Page

        1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
          By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
          Dismiss Notice