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Post extension wrecked garden

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Douglas Wayte, Jul 27, 2012.

  1. Douglas Wayte

    Douglas Wayte Apprentice Gardener

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    We recently had an extension and the removed ground was piled into the garden. So now it is sandy and full of stones and some building waste. We want to put it back to lawn and beds but not quite sure where to start. So should we rotivate, remove stones, rotivate in new top soil, just put top soil on top, use seed or sods, etc. Any advice welcome!
     
  2. Jenny namaste

    Jenny namaste Total Gardener

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    Hallo Douglas,
    you've got a fair old job on your hands there and I would suggest you clear it as thoroughly as you are able as it will pay off in the long run.
    Don't rush it and remember to reward yourself for your achievements .
    Welcome to Gardeners Corner and we do LOVE progress piccies please,
    Jenny namaste
     
  3. clueless1

    clueless1 member... yep, that's what I am:)

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    Hello and welcome.

    When my mate moved into his brand new house, just built, he was only in for a short time when the lovely green lawn started to die. On advice from people more knowledgeable than him (or me) he decided to investigate the ground, and found loads of sand and rubble just below the surface. The builders and simply levelled the ground and then thrown turf over the top.

    My mate spent weeks digging and removing great lumps of rubble.

    He told me some time afterwards that if he had to do it all again with the benefit of hindsight, he'd just hire a mini digger to scrape off the top, and then get a lorry load of top soil in.

    That's what my mate said. I can't really say because I've never had that particular problem.
     
  4. Fat Controller

    Fat Controller Cuddly 'NEW SHED' Scottish Admin! Staff Member

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    Welcome to GC Douglas :)

    I was speaking to a friend the other day who has a similar problem - his house was built quite a long time ago (late 80's at a guess) on an old industrial and agricultural site, and none of the gardens in his street are much cop; indeed, there is only one in the entire estate that looks good, and there is no doubt that it is an avid gardener that lives there as it is truly beautiful.

    Anyway, his back garden is simply grass and has been since he moved in, and to be honest its little more than a field - he is now wanting to make something of it (half decent lawn, planted borders etc), and has started by laying decking at the back door of the house. In doing so, he has dug out a phenomenal amount of rubble, and what isn't rubble is frankly rubbish.

    He asked from my opinion when I was round the other day, and the only way that I can see out of it for him is to do as clueless1 has suggested - dig the lot out and discard it, then get a couple of truck loads of good top soil back onto it and levelled, then either seed it and watch it grow or (his preferred option, due to having kids) lay turf over the top.

    I reckon that he is looking at a good few grand by the time he has done (and a few bottles of alcohol to me for his seedlings next year :WINK1:), but it is the only way that I can think of that is going to give a good and long term result.

    Good luck :)
     
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