Project recover

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Fat Controller, Jul 25, 2020.

  1. Fat Controller

    Fat Controller 'Cuddly' Scottish Admin! Staff Member

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    It is quite remarkable how long it is taking to restore some sort of normality in the garden, probably being made worse by the fact that I now only have a few hours in me at best before I tire and have to stop for another day. We've made some reasonable progress, at the patio end of the house and even in the bulk of the rest of the garden, however the very back remains a problem.

    20200720_171521.jpg

    The grass used to go all the way back, however whilst I was in hospital a lavatera and loganberry got right out of hand and essentially destroyed the grass. They have been dispatched and the heap on the right hand side is the lavatera which has been drying to allow it to be shredded or burnt. The composters were essentially whacked where they stand now, but are not all that easily accessible. Yes, it is a mess.

    We also have another slight issue, in that we purchased a rotary drier last year (we call them whirlygigs where I come from, what do you call yours?) and initially we put it in a really large pot full of bricks and sand, as a sort of stand... however, it leaned and didn't really work and has been out of use since. Using a tumble dryer when we shouldn't need to is getting to me in more ways than one, so that too needs to be resolved.

    So, my idea is to use decking boards to create a bit of a raised bed at the back:

    o2.jpg

    We have some spare old paving slabs hiding behind our shed that we could use to put the composters on, and having them one behind the other (as you look from this direction) would minimise their impact whilst also making them more accessible. Whirlygig to sit in front of the raised bed (or perhaps at the very front edge, just inside it to make grass trimming easier) with the remaining grass seeded over to hopefully regrow next year.

    Currently, I am not entirely sure what we would grow here, but that could be worked out (maybe tatties etc to begin with?) and also not sure whether to go one decking board width high or two.

    Comments, suggestions, advice all welcome as always :)
     
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    • Jymi riddler

      Jymi riddler Chilled Gardener

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      The first thing that strikes me Russ, is you've got the composters staying in the sunny corner, and plants planned in the LH shady one.
      I would be inclined to swop roles in those corners. (Don't tell me the sun was on the left all morning!)
      I may well have this all wrong because the photo might not give a true reflection of the general sun direction.
      Let's be honest, plenty of sun = good plants. Poor sun = little progress, though a clump of rhubarb would thrive on the left no doubt..
      Hope I've not been too painfully obvious.. there's some very good gardeners on this forum!
       
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        Last edited: Jul 25, 2020
      • Fat Controller

        Fat Controller 'Cuddly' Scottish Admin! Staff Member

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        The photo is not hugely informative - the reason that the composters are there is because there is a line of evergreens leading up that side (they sit in front of an evergreen and a lilac) so nothing will really grow there. Admittedly, the other corner is not a lot better with the huge evergreen - but, as I sit here typing now, that evergreen is directly in my line of sight.

        The left side is north facing, the back you see there faces east. The photo was taken in the late afternoon one day this week.
         
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        • Sheal

          Sheal Total Gardener

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          They used to be called whirlygigs but the updated term is rotary line which I use now. I've had them for years - no decades. The first one I had was sunk in concrete in a bucket, left to set then taken from the bucket and 'planted'. My current one fits into a spiked post that's hammered into the ground and despite being in a windy area is still upright. The secret is to hang the washing evenly all round the line, that includes long items and those with extra weight like jeans or towels. I have a four pronged line so for example three or four pairs of jeans - hang one on each side, the same with towels etc. I always use the outer lines first too. When the wind blows the weight is evenly distributed and the heavy items don't all move to one side, which eventually makes the line lean.
           
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          • ARMANDII

            ARMANDII Low Flying Administrator Staff Member

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            [​IMG]
             
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            • Jymi riddler

              Jymi riddler Chilled Gardener

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              I made the mistake of purchasing Mrs J, a tumble dryer.
              It's great during the winter but she likes the convenience so much that the rotary drier is now redundant.
              I've raised the issue of carbon foot print and costs, but it went down like a lead balloon.
              It's a permanent essential item now apparently and you don't argue with Mrs J, trust me.
               
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              • NigelJ

                NigelJ Total Gardener

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                I've had one of those rotary lines since I moved in here, find it excellent. Like Sheal's it fits into a spiked post driven into the ground. I've replaced the line once and had to improvise a fastening for one of the arms. I have a tumble drier in the garage for wet days, but I prefer the smell and feel of washing dried on the line.
                 
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                • Fat Controller

                  Fat Controller 'Cuddly' Scottish Admin! Staff Member

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                  We had one previously, however the hole that it stood in is in the middle of the patio (not very conveniently located) and the pole on the new one is thicker/wider than the old one. We'd have to lift some of the patio, chip out the old ground socket for it to allow us to concrete the new one in - and to be honest, that is beyond me nowadays. I will be needing help to do what we are planning to be honest.

                  Given that we won't have a bottom on the raised bed, is it safe to assume that a one board barrier around it would be sufficient, or should I be looking at two?
                   
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                  • Jymi riddler

                    Jymi riddler Chilled Gardener

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                    My neighbour has made his with two. I envy him as i see him work on it.
                    It's so much easier at a higher level and with so many advanages.
                    Lovely deep loam/further from ground pests/less bending down etc..
                    It's a bit more fiddly n costly to install, but worth every effort in my view.
                     
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                    • Fat Controller

                      Fat Controller 'Cuddly' Scottish Admin! Staff Member

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                      The cost could be the restricting factor there then - especially for the soil to fill it.
                       
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                      • Jymi riddler

                        Jymi riddler Chilled Gardener

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                        Hmm, i guess so unless somone local was removing top soil to install a drive etc.
                        But any raised bed is a good bed. I would get down to my local stables (I'm often there) and fetch up plenty of the older stuff from the bottom of the pile. With an overwintered bed filled with half soil and half the stable compost you'll have a rich bed ready for your chosen veg next spring.
                         
                      • Fat Controller

                        Fat Controller 'Cuddly' Scottish Admin! Staff Member

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                        I am going to have to go the delivery route for topsoil/compost/manure - there is only one stables locally to me, and it is rare you see them making their manure available. Besides, you don't get a lot of manure in a saloon car, and you don't get any in the boot of my Jag!
                         
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                        • Jymi riddler

                          Jymi riddler Chilled Gardener

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                          Jaguar.. Nice,
                          Years ago my brother aquired a Jaguar 'S' type. 3.8 litres with a 6 in line twin SU carbed motor.
                          All leather. (Still a beautiful car today).. but worth a tad more if it was still in the family.
                          I'm fortunate that we have a large equestrian centre 4 miles away (with free manure providing they like you) it transforms our heavy clay soil to a plants paradise.
                          Nothing nicer than rich dark loam.
                          Someone local might just fetch you a load FC and then you'll be in buisiness.
                           
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