Replacement Tree Question

Discussion in 'Trees' started by Zaria123, Feb 2, 2019.

  1. Zaria123

    Zaria123 Apprentice Gardener

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +0
    Hi Folks

    I've just joined today as we, are moving in to our new house with a substantial garden.

    I have a question regarding trees.

    Currently we have a line of 6 huge Leyland Cyprus Trees, which haven't been kept in control very well, are over 30ft tall, and have sprouted additional large side branches (I believe after the trees had been topped many years ago). The are on the boundary of our field, and hundreds of feet away from any building.

    I wanted to cut the trees down, and replacement with a Tree, that was perhaps originally indigenous to the UK, would grow at a more controlled rate (or a tree that had a limuted end size growth), but also be evergreen. Does such a tree exist, if so has anyone any recommendations.

    Thanks
    Alan
     
  2. LauraRoslin

    LauraRoslin Gardener

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2018
    Messages:
    266
    Location:
    In the middle
    Ratings:
    +428
  3. Marley Farley

    Marley Farley Affable Admin! Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2005
    Messages:
    30,554
    Occupation:
    Grandmother Gardener Councillor Homemaker
    Location:
    Under the Edge Zone 8b
    Ratings:
    +13,998
    Hi @Zaria123 and Welcome.. I would check you don’t need planning permission to take the Leylands down.? I would double check that.. If you decide to go ahead if planning is needed most Tree surgeons will do that for you if you accept their quote but you must tell them when they come to quote.. It would make the whole idea much simlper for you...
    I would also get the stumps ground out as well.. Then I would get some fresh soil and compost and add to the area before you plant anything.. See what your soil ph is after the old trees...
    One really nice thing you could do is to get some pleeched trees and fencing underneath.. There are some in the next village they look so lovely.. Heres a few ideas on that Pleached Trees

    Otherwise a Beech hedge is always a beautiful edition.. Maybe a tree interspaced.?
    This link is full of different ideas for trees for hedging
    Hedges Direct Ltd
     
  4. shiney

    shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2006
    Messages:
    43,259
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired - Last Century!!!
    Location:
    Herts/Essex border. Zone 8b
    Ratings:
    +71,683
    If they are the common Leyland Cypress x Cupressocyparis leylandii (usually just called Leylandii) then there is almost no restriction about cutting them down as they are a hybrid. You mustn't cut them if they contain any bird nests during the breeding season, but your tree surgeons would know this.

    As @Marley Farley says, you would be better off have the trees stump ground otherwise there will be little chance of being able to grow anything else there. You would then be best to dig in plenty of compost and well rotted horse manure.

    @LauraRoslin link will give you a lot to choose from. You can then get the info that you need on how big you wish it them to grow and this will depend on the purpose for them.

    When getting quotes from tree surgeons ask them the price for cutting down, removal and stump grinding. The removal of the cut wood could be expensive and as you seem to have a field it may be better to burn it in situ. Make sure you get two different quotes for those situations. I also always ask them if they're insured and that if they do the job you would like to see a copy of their insurance. This can sometimes show you the difference between cowboys and professionals.

    Good luck :dbgrtmb:
     
  5. Verdun

    Verdun Passionate gardener

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2012
    Messages:
    7,475
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    West Cornwall
    Ratings:
    +17,451
    Hiya Zaria123 and welcome :)
    Hollies would grow well there....apart from the indigenous plain green varieties there are superb variegated varieties like Golden King, Handsworth New Silver and the prolific berrying JC Van Tol :)
    They make trouble free beautiful trees, can be pruned to size or shape and are quicker growing than often suggested:)
     
    • Like Like x 1
      Last edited: Feb 3, 2019
    • Zaria123

      Zaria123 Apprentice Gardener

      Joined:
      Feb 2, 2019
      Messages:
      4
      Gender:
      Male
      Ratings:
      +0
      Thanks for all the info, really appreciated.

      I've looked at the links and the different types of trees suggested here and the links. The more I look the confused I get.

      These tress don't need any approval to cut down, and we have a log burner, and open fireplace, so we could chop them up, store them indoors to dry and use them as fuel.

      It seems the majority of trees that are indigenous to the UK are deciduous. I did want something that would remain green throughout the year.

      I don't really have an aversion to conifers, just the sheer scale these particular varieties grow to and at the rate they grow is the problem. I've attached a photo where you can judge the scale by my car parked below them. I'd guess they are at least 40ft + in height.

      Our property is an old 18th Century Watermill, and has a small river running through it, and these grow along upper bank. I think there are 4 trees in total. The do block the sun from the south of the house, so this area of the driveway is always in shade.

      This may be asking a lot, but does anyone know if a specific variety of Conifer I could use, that would grow fairly rapidly, but have a maximum growth height and width of spread? Ideally I'd like something that wouldn't grow more than about 15ft, and had a slimmer spread? (If that makes sense).

      Your advice is really much appreciated, and helping me decide what to do.

      Thanks so much
      Alan
       

      Attached Files:

    • LauraRoslin

      LauraRoslin Gardener

      Joined:
      Dec 16, 2018
      Messages:
      266
      Location:
      In the middle
      Ratings:
      +428
      The only indigenous conifer is the Scots Pine. I don't know if that is suitable though as I think they grow quite tall.
       
    • LauraRoslin

      LauraRoslin Gardener

      Joined:
      Dec 16, 2018
      Messages:
      266
      Location:
      In the middle
      Ratings:
      +428
    • shiney

      shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

      Joined:
      Jul 3, 2006
      Messages:
      43,259
      Gender:
      Male
      Occupation:
      Retired - Last Century!!!
      Location:
      Herts/Essex border. Zone 8b
      Ratings:
      +71,683
      Leylandii are not particularly good for fires but if the wood is free then you can't complain. They don't give off a lot of heat for their size. Also, it's best not to have them on an open fire as they spit - even if seasoned. They do have a nice smell. They're also a wood that can be a bit sooty.

      If the site is to the south of the property then I would say that a deciduous tree is better. In the winter the sun is low in the sky and it would shade a lot more of the rest of the land. Whereas a deciduous tree would drop its leaves and allow the low sun to shine through.

      As it seems to be alongside a waterway then poplars are considered ideal. Claude Monet loved them.
       
    Loading...

    Share This Page

    1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
      By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
      Dismiss Notice