Sheds, sheds, sheds... Argh!!

Discussion in 'Gardening Discussions' started by Joolz, Jun 23, 2019.

  1. Joolz

    Joolz Gardener

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    So, we're on the lookout for a sparkly, brand new shed to replace our old, falling down (I'm sure it's only the ivy keeping it upright) dilapidated shed.. It was in the garden when we moved in, and that was 17 years ago, so I reckon the poor thing is 25 years old at least..
    Your foot goes through the floor when you walk in it and I think Mr Ratty and his many, many chums have been having a rave up in there! it's way, way, WAY past it's sell by date now..

    So the hunt for Shed October has begun... Simple enough task you would think...

    OMG.. How wrong was I. Crumbs, there's soooooooo much choice, it's a little bit bewildering really.
    I know it needs to be a minimum of 10x8 and we want it to be in the reverse apex style. It will have a slabbed base (something the old one doesn't have, poor mite).

    We've ruled out metal sheds, so it's wood, or as my darling hubby has now thrown a curveball into the mix, plastic! Not the crappy plastic one's mind, nooooo. He's found a couple that look to be a very sturdy construction and they seem to be., well.... quite nice! BUT WOWZERS..... THE PRICE!

    I'm looking at the traditional wood! Old school see.

    I'll add some pix of the ones we're both looking at, and if you've any experience of any of them or have one yourself, I'd love to know your thoughts about them.

    We're open to suggestions, so please if you can recommend a stockist or particular shed, share the info as I think I might go slightly mad with it all... Yes, madder than I am already..

    So, the wooden sheds are my choice (yes, I know they're basically the same shed!!! lol) and the placcy ones are the hubs..

    HELP!
    My choices
    Adley 10' x 8' Pressure Treated Premium Shiplap Reverse Apex Shed
    10ft x 8ft Waltons Shiplap Pressure Treated Reverse Apex Wooden Garden Shed

    Hubby's choices.
    Keter Oakland 11ft x 7ft 6 (3.4 x 2.3m) Side Door Shed | Costco UK
    Keter Artisan 11ft x 7ft (3.2 x 2.1m) Shed | Costco UK
     

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  2. JWK

    JWK Gardener

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  3. andrews

    andrews Super Gardener

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    Two very different styles.

    The plastic ones would fit better in a modern garden. Not sure how they would handle condensation but they are maintenance free.

    I do like the idea of double doors which you can also get with wooden sheds.

    Fat Controllers shed looked really sturdy and would be on my list if I was needing a new shed
     
  4. Fat Controller

    Fat Controller Cuddly 'NEW SHED' Scottish Admin! Staff Member

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    Hi @Joolz - I am just about to pop out, but I will post back later with some of my experience so far and hopefully give you an idea.

    To be going on with, the one negative that I found against the plastic sheds was ventilation and the potential for condensation. Having just been to hell and back with a metal shed, that was an utter no-no for me, and my mind was made up when I went to Costco and wandered into one that they had assembled. I reckon they would be dry enough in terms of leaking though.

    My new shed cost a chunk, and took a lot of careful planning/assembly, but it is absolutely rock solid and I fully expect it to be still standing in 15-20 years time with a bit of care.

    I will be back later with more detail and some pics for you.
     
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    • Doghouse Riley

      Doghouse Riley Head Gardener

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      This just an observation, not a criticism.

      A lot of store bought wooden sheds look good, but they are mostly built with timber from "sustainable" sources. Fast growing trees of low density wood.

      It's all about protecting them. We get sold on "pressure treated." Or as I call it, "given a good coat of looking at." They need regular attention if they are to last.

      I built mine from reclaimed timber and "proper" roofing plywood.

      This is it this year, after I'd replaced the roofing felt, for the second time in its life.
      Still rock-solid no rot.

      P1020443.JPG

      I built it in 1976. The windows even then were reclaimed, made in the mid sixties when they were still using "proper" wood.
       
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      • Fat Controller

        Fat Controller Cuddly 'NEW SHED' Scottish Admin! Staff Member

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        OK, sorry I couldn't post more earlier....

        I found a number of things when I was looking for a shed, and it was a deeply frustrating experience all round to be honest - however, in my case it ended well.

        There are pros and cons to both wooden and plastic sheds - I'll go for the plastic ones first, just because I can....

        Pros:
        Uniformity of panel sizes thanks to the manufacturing process
        Relatively quick and easy to assemble
        Surprisingly sturdy
        Intelligently designed to prevent leaks
        Look modern
        Does not require periodic treatment

        Cons:
        Uniformity of panel sizes could be an Achilles heel if your base is not entirely level
        Need to be secured/pinned down - although heavy, especially when filled, they remain wind prone
        Airflow is not the best - even inside Costco, out of the sun, it felt very stale and stuffy in the display shed
        Plastic is even more of a fire risk than wood
        Sizes available and layout thereof does not necessarily give the most usable interior space
        Harder to screw into to hang stuff up
        Cost is comparatively high
        Often don't have windows


        Wooden sheds (I will go into more detail about my specific one in a minute):

        Pros:
        Panels will flex a bit when constructing to allow you to compensate for some variations in the ground
        Sturdy (if you buy the right one!)
        Tried and tested designs known not to leak
        More often than not come with their own floor
        Natural airflow, almost breathes - dries very quickly (eg, if you leave the door open, it rains and gets wet)
        Generally, you get more shed for your money
        Often have windows for light/air
        More options for hanging stuff up.

        Cons:
        Require some sort of regular wood treatment as @Doghouse Riley rightly points out
        Construction takes comparatively longer (to be done correctly)
        There is likely to be a bit more 'settlement' once built
        Can be a bit of a minefield to choose one, as there are a LOT about, some of which are proper duds

        More in a minute...

        Windows are often flimsy (easily sorted though)
         
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        • Fat Controller

          Fat Controller Cuddly 'NEW SHED' Scottish Admin! Staff Member

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          20190623_151907.jpg

          A quick pic of mine this afternoon. I got this one from a company called Project Timber after a lot of research and reading a ton of reviews.

          Reviews of the company themselves were not great, but then again this was the same for just about every company, and these folks came out as good as just about anyone else.

          The upside of selecting this company is that there is a vast choice of customisation available and if you want something a bit different, they will advise if they are able to make the configuration you want. The other upside is that they seem to make the sheds with the highest eaves height - this pays dividends once assembled, as it is so much easier to hang stuff or stack stuff inside.

          Delivery was initially stated as being six weeks, however they delivered within two. I specified that I wanted the thickest walls, roof to match and the thickest floor. The floor is the most impressive of the whole lot at 32mm thick! It is like a dancefloor :biggrin:
          I did not however specify any upgrades to the roofing cover, going with the standard mineral felt, and it seems to be just fine.

          The instructions supplied are a bit on the 'generic' side, covering a number of models, and they are not the clearest instructions in the world. You do need to follow them though, as there is a sequence to the build and that is for a reason. I can see where some of their negative reviews came from, because in today's modern world where a lot of folks think DIY consists of making their own coffee, this type of shed requires a bit of DIY knowledge and a bit of patience to get it assembled just right. All in all, it took us two full days to get it wind and watertight, although one of those days was blowing a gale, so you might achieve it in one longish day if you really went for it.

          Build quality is generally top notch in shed terms - if you are expecting completely even panel lines, and everything to butt up to within a millimetre, then this is NOT the shed for you. If you are a realist and realise that wood is natural, and there are going to be some differing lines, or you might need to shave a bit off here and there to get it to fit, you will be just fine.

          The windows (standard ones) that I got are very flimsy - I had mine up for less than a week and managed to punch a hole in one with the handle of a wheelie bin. I have gaffa taped it for now, and will replace both windows with polycarbonate ones in due course.

          The doors are as thick as you would expect on your house, and just as solid. However, as the building settles you will find that they sag a bit in the middle and need adjustment. I am going to replace the hinges on mine with really heavy duty gate style hinges (about £30 all in) to try and prevent this from happening, as I don't think that the supplied hinges are just as butch as they should be. Other than that, it seems to be dry, rock solid and is going to make an excellent workshop as well as being a shed (once I get round to making my workbench!)

          Customer service was good - they took into account the fact that I am disabled, and specified that their driver bring everything into the back garden for me, and they rang on the morning of the delivery just to confirm everything. Despite some of their reviews, I can only speak as I find, and they were good.

          The equivalent shed to ours at the local garden centres was between £3.5k and £6k - we paid around £1600.

          Beware of the really cheap sheds, as many of them have got wood so thin you could spit peas through it.
           
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          • Vince

            Vince Not so well known for it.

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            I will be extending our current metal shed using timber to create a workshop, I shall do all the work myself and build the extention from scratch using "heavy duty" timber, I know not everybody has my experience or tooling for working with timber but for me, the cheapest option for a quality build.

            The chickens will be a bit miffed though because I'm stealing half their current run!
             
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            • redstar

              redstar Total Gardener

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              we have in our local newspaper, folks that will come and get the old sheds, not sure the cost. just wondering if you all have that also there? anyway, if you do a search this topic was talked about already, might find other thoughts there.

              we have a shed for the garden stuff. and then my husband has two garages he brought in for his cars on the other side of the property. there are at least two local shed places to purchase them from in the area. often seen on flat beds being delivered places. they also sell gazebos.
               
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              • noisette47

                noisette47 Total Gardener

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                When we moved over here, we stored all our worldly goods in a couple of Keter plastic sheds. They were brilliant. Although rodents did get in through the pre-formed holes in the integral floor, a few blue sachets put paid to them with no damage done.
                The sheds are on concrete bases and still going strong 13 years later.
                Only major drawback is that all storage shelves and hooks have to be free-standing as you can't screw into the plastic, or hang stuff from the cross braces. One minor drawback which probably wouldn't arise in UK is that paper wasps love to build nests in the ventilated square-sections that run down each side.
                 
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                • Doghouse Riley

                  Doghouse Riley Head Gardener

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                  Looking long term with a shed, if it has a felt roof, check the quality.
                  If you have a shed and the felt is getting a bit tired. Get a quality non-tear polymer variety. as a replacement sold by roofing supply wholesalers, not available in the likes of B&Q.
                   
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                  • Joolz

                    Joolz Gardener

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                    Thank you all, so very much for your highly informative replies, they've been tremendously helpful.
                    @noisette47 just passed on your info to hubby and I think (hope) that the lack of being able to hang stuff directly onto the walls of the shed and the potential for rats/mice to move in has called a halt to one of those. Personally, I'm quite pleased as although they're easy, I'm really not keen. We're also in a very rural location and the house is listed so to me it just wouldn't sit right to have something like that in the garden. \

                    @Doghouse Riley & @Fat Controller Thankfully hubby is a dab hand at diy. He finished off building our garage after builders didn't finish the job properly and as an added bonus father-in-law is an absolute whizz in that too..
                    So more curveballs have come into the fold now. Either go down the route of buying one big workshop/shed and remove both of the ones we have or build it ourselves to our spec. F-i-L was for many years in his working life a draughtsman and has built many garden buildings of various guises. He built our wood store to spec about 5 years ago. (piccies below) So, we're also looking into that.
                    Thank you both again, I really appreciate your input.IMG_6182.jpgIMG_6185.jpg
                     
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                    • Joolz

                      Joolz Gardener

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                      I also need to give the wood store a treatment of preservative! The round area in the middle of the door opening did once have an outside clock on it, but high winds put paid to that last year. We haven't found a decent replacement yet.

                      @redstar there probably is something similar here, but, I wouldn't pass on the smaller shed as it really is on its very last legs. The other one isn't in bad form if truth be told, needs a small section of flooring sorted and new roof covering. I'm trying to persuade the hubster that we could re-site it down by my greenhouse and I could use it there as storage for my garden tools and overwintering plants. He thinks it's too big to have in that area as it's roughly 12 x10 (I think)
                      I will keep suggesting it though! I really could use it! :blue thumb:
                       
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                      • Graham B

                        Graham B Gardener

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                        Definitely go shiplap if you're buying wood.

                        Re plastic, I don't care what lies the manufacturer tells on their promotional stuff, it will suffer from UV, lose its colour and go brittle. It just happens. So if you buy plastic, don't think of it as being that long term.

                        For preservative, if you want different colours from just plain brown or green, I thoroughly recommend Cuprinol Garden Shades. I put two coats on my shed (a lovely pale sky blue, from mixing two different shades) and 4 years on the colour hasn't faded and the wood is still as waterproof as when it started.

                        If you go wood and you're using any kind of preservative, one tip. It's a damn sight easier to get it done (without drips or runs) if you paint the panels lying flat on the lawn. It also lets you paint where panels will join, which otherwise wouldn't get preservative and could give a weak spot for rot to start. So get that done before you put it together - it feels a shame to wait to build it, but trust me, it'll work out better.
                         
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                          Last edited: Jun 23, 2019
                        • Joolz

                          Joolz Gardener

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                          @Graham B Thanks so much for your reply. I really appreciate everybody's thoughts and input on this.
                          I think that hubby's thoughts of the plastic ones are not as positive now. He has wood turning machinery which he would like to keep in the workshop area, my comments of condensation and the lack of being able to attach things to the walls are a big deciding factor here. If we go down the design and build it ourselves route we would definitely do all the preserving/painting before it was constructed as you rightly point out, you can't cover everything once it's built. :blue thumb:
                           
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