SHEDS

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by fumanchu, May 30, 2016.

  1. fumanchu

    fumanchu Gardener

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    Has anybody tried a plastic shed on an exposed site? Does anybody know how long they last? I want a new shed but we are high and exposed here with bad winters..
     
  2. Fat Controller

    Fat Controller Cuddly 'NEW SHED' Scottish Admin! Staff Member

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    No experience of plastic ones, but I can honestly tell you to avoid metal ones at all costs. We went for a metal one a couple of years ago, and it is a disaster of a thing - leaks like a sieve.
     
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    • fumanchu

      fumanchu Gardener

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      Not seen them I don't think, but Costco has some nice plastic ones - only thing is I really can't see it lasting long up here. Just thought I'd ask :)
       
    • liam green

      liam green Gardener

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      i presume they have anchor points in the base, id make a decent base below bolt it down and you will be fine
       
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      • fumanchu

        fumanchu Gardener

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        You think they'd stand up to extreme cold ok?
         
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        • liam green

          liam green Gardener

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          id presume so, you won't have the amount of expansion and contraction extremes you would get with wood and you won't get the rapid corrosion of the metal sheds , anything made from poly type plastics is pretty weather proof like that if have thought
           
        • Loofah

          Loofah Well used member

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          Sounds a bad option to me. Build your own and make it solid.
           
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          • liam green

            liam green Gardener

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            Why is it bad? I have seen a few and they all look pretty decent? When you say make it solid how would you make it less adverse to changing weather in that type of conditions?
             
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            • Loofah

              Loofah Well used member

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              Because plastic exposed to harsh environmental conditions goes rigid and brittle in addition to being light. A solid wooden frames with timber cladding and treatment will last longer and a custom build will meet all personal requirements.
               
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              • fumanchu

                fumanchu Gardener

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                This is what am worried about. They don't feel that solid so I know it would need good anchoring - but we've had winters down to -17 here and I'm just not sure it will last long. My youngest son is a joiner but the wee sod is always "too busy" to help his mum & dad. However there is a place 15 miles up the road who sell shed and will build them for you. Just thought the plastic would save the husband (who's not getting any younger) from constantly going up ladders patching up the damn shed lol
                 
              • Sandy Ground

                Sandy Ground Total Gardener

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                @Loofah I'm with you on this. The only type of shed that survives in the climate we have here is one built in wood. Preferably treated with one of the older traditional paints.
                 
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                • Fat Controller

                  Fat Controller Cuddly 'NEW SHED' Scottish Admin! Staff Member

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                  What about a sort of compromise - a wooden shed, with plastic or metal corrugated sheeting for the roof? That would hopefully negate frequent repairs?
                   
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                  • Gay Gardener

                    Gay Gardener Total Gardener

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                    I've never had a plastic shed so can't comment on that, though agree with others about degradation under harsh conditions, also if you are exposed think about high winds and flying objects (branches etc) and impacts. I think also I'd be concerned about a forceful wind catching if face-on as I don't think they are that heavy and possibly compromising the structure.

                    In my experience, wood with a wooden roof covered with felt is fine for an urban/sheltered position, for me the the felt has always gone first and needs replaced, if I had it here it wouldn't last long I don't think as we are quite rural.

                    I've found the best combination is wood construction and corrugated tin/metal roof, especially where exposed. The corrugated roof is generally fairly long lived I think and very resilient to weather and objects bashing on it.

                    My current set up (inherited) is a wood construction (very solid and a one-off home made by the looks of it) with a corrugated tin roof, flooring is brick, think it is anchored at each corner post sunk into concrete, much larger than your average garden shed. We are exposed to wind and driving rain (probably not to the extent you are) and it is very sturdy and weatherproof. The wood construction from what neighbours tell me was erected around the 1960s, it is still going strong though has a slight list (not sure why) but will last many years to come and is generally in good nick. It has wood protector on it. The window frame rotted a few years back and was easy to replace (the only thing I've done in 6 years), the door is not the prettiest due to the wind catching it while open and flinging it about but sound. The roof as far as I know is 15-20 years old, also sound and can take a battering. It takes a wind battering but also flying branches etc. and has dealt with all of that.

                    Good luck with your decision.

                    GG
                     
                    Last edited: May 31, 2016
                  • miraflores

                    miraflores Total Gardener

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                    hi - when you say high: is that hill high or mountain high and exposed to what? For instance if it is exposed to wind, it is not only the material used that makes the difference, but also the shape of the structure, and how the parts are anchored one to the other. Metal sheds have that industrial look and are boiling hot under the sun and not particularly warm in the cold. Hopeless in a humid environment. Corrugated plastic roofing (10mm approx) is not a sight to look at, but can be amazingly strong.
                     
                    Last edited: May 31, 2016
                  • shiney

                    shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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                    I've had a metal shed for eight years and it's as sturdy and rust free as when I bought it. I have no idea whether it gets too hot in summer or too cold in winter because it doesn't matter as I don't live in it. The wooden sheds were eaten by rats!!
                     
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