Sowing perennial seeds

Discussion in 'Greenhouse Growing' started by kerrygirl, Jun 1, 2015.

  1. kerrygirl

    kerrygirl Gardener

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    I have a query, you know the way it says on perennial seed packets ' sowing months Feb, Mar, April, May, June.
    Flowering period May, June, July, August.'( next year)

    Does that mean if I sow them in Feb they will flower in May or if I sow them in May they will flower in August. Or will they flower in their natural time regardless of when they are sown.
    I hope this makes sense.
     
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    • Anthony Rogers

      Anthony Rogers Guest

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      Hi Kerry,
      Now us the perfect time to sow hardy perennial /biennial seeds.
      Sow them now as you would any other seeds, taking into consideration their individual needs if course, and then grow them on until about september. Then plant them out where you want them to flower/live permanently.

      They will flower at their normal time next year.

      There are some perennials which will flower in their first year ( e.g. pansies, some dianthus, some delphiniums etc) , however it is much too late now.
      I have also found that on most of these it's always better to grow a larger plant during the first year as this gives you better and more flowers in the second and subsequent years.

      Hope I've helped :)
       
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      • Fern4

        Fern4 Total Gardener

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        What variety of seeds are they? :)
         
      • kerrygirl

        kerrygirl Gardener

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        Thank you Anthony, yes I agree it is better to have a stronger plant.
        I have campanula plants in my rockery with 5yrs which I purchased in a garden centre, it is now in flower. I grew some from seed (which I purchased) two years ago and there is no trace of a flower. Have you any idea what is going on.
         
      • Anthony Rogers

        Anthony Rogers Guest

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        Sorry Kerry, I would have thought they'd have flowered by now. Are they in the right situation for their type?
         
      • kerrygirl

        kerrygirl Gardener

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        I grew them in pots as I wanted them strong before planting.
         
      • PeterS

        PeterS Total Gardener

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        Hi kerrygirl. There are quite a lot of perennials that will flower in their first year. Thompson and Morgan, and Mr Fothergill's catalogues identify first year flowering plants. But as Anthony said its probably too late now. First year flowering perennials often flower late in their first year and then at the normal time in subsequent years.

        You may not know that plants, like humans, go through a juvenile stage before they become adult. Sometimes juvenile plants can look different and sometimes have different shaped leaves from adults, and they are too young to reproduce. Most garden plants become adult in their second year and then can flower and set seed. However some trees take many years. For instance a Beech tree might take 60 years before it becomes adult and only then can it flower and bear nuts. That's why you see a lot of things like Wisteria being sold from cuttings. From seed a Wisteria could take 10 or even 20 years to flower. But, curiously a cutting from an adult (ie flowering plant) will always be an adult (because its a clone) and so can start to flower almost immediately.
         
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        • kerrygirl

          kerrygirl Gardener

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          Sorry I'm so late getting back to you all. I've been so busy. Thanks for all the information. I understand things a lot clearer now.
           
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