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Steep Bank Problem

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Tintin, May 31, 2005.

  1. Tintin

    Tintin Apprentice Gardener

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    I have a steep grass bank, 50ft long by 10ft high and its a big problem to mow it.

    I want to plant it with something that won't need any maintenance and will withstand the rough weather that comes at us from the Pennines. Also do I need to kill the grass off first?
     
  2. Ladybird

    Ladybird Gardener

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    Hi Tintin that's a big task, on a bank, is it just grass or many other weeds, docks, nettles, thistles or even brambles ?

    [ 31. May 2005, 04:25 PM: Message edited by: Ladybird ]
     
  3. Ladybird

    Ladybird Gardener

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    Wildflower and some herbs may be the answer,just right time now, once cleared of what ever.
     
  4. Bayleaf

    Bayleaf Gardener

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    Low growing scrambling plants would work such as periwinkle, ivy, or climbers left to crawl such as clematis armandii. Could underplant with small bulbs - dwarf narcissi, crocus, species tulips (chrysantha, saxatalis, turkestana). Low growing Shrubs such as Lonicera pileata, Prunus "Otto Luykens" are low maintenance, as is Liriope muscari (grass like with purple flowers late summer). These would all help to "bind" the soil and stop it sliding down. They are not fussy as to soil type either. You would need to remove the grass, other wise it will keep growing amongst the plants and compete with them for food & moisture - as Ladybird says do it now, ready for planting in autumn (if you put new plants in now you will need to keep them moist) - you can always wait till autumn, or cover the area with old carpets, polythene or whatever you have to hand (If you use geotextile, you can plant through it)
     
  5. Tintin

    Tintin Apprentice Gardener

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    Hello Bayleaf,

    That's really useful advice on removing the grass.

    What do you think about planting some sort of Cotoneaster?

    Tintin
     
  6. Bayleaf

    Bayleaf Gardener

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    Yeah, could do - Cotoneaster horizontalis (herringbone cotoneaster) would do (& spreads too) or jasminium nudiflorum for winter flowers. Both are deciduous.
     
  7. Tintin

    Tintin Apprentice Gardener

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    Hi Bayleaf

    I've looked up all the plants you suggested and am going to use swathes of the Prunus, Lonicera and Cotoneaster. I'm going to a section at a time as its so big using the geotextile you suggested.

    I don't suppose you would be able to tell me how far apart to plant the above?

    Also I noticed that there was also a Cotoneaster Dammeri, how would you rate that against the horozontalis?

    I've been trying to get this kind of idea and info for the last year so I'm really grateful.

    Tintin
     
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