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Stinging Nettles - is a suitable weedkiller the "best" method of removal?

Discussion in 'Pests, Diseases and Cures' started by TheMadHedger, May 6, 2016.

  1. TheMadHedger

    TheMadHedger Gardener

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    Must admit that I'm not keen on using chemicals but I'm also not keen on digging up about 60 square feet of nettle roots .........

    In a nutshell, a corner of a field that I own is infested with nettles but I want to use that corner to plant some trees. Sheep use the field, as do my dogs, however that corner is fenced off so that's a plus point.

    Is a weedkiller my only viable option? If so, which is the best? There's also grass with the nettles in that corner which I would prefer not to kill off.

    Any suggestions please? Naturally any weedkiller won't be pet (or human) friendly but with the area being fenced off at least the sheep and dogs can't get to it. I then have to ensure that I don't apply any to myself ......... :)
     
  2. noisette47

    noisette47 Total Gardener

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    It's simple....glyphosate sprayed on the new growth will travel down and kill the roots. It might take a couple of years to eradicate the nettles completely. Glyphosate does kill anything green that it comes into contact with, so you'd have to re-sow grass seed if that's what you want there. Alternatively, a selective weedkiller containing 2,4D will kill the nettles off (temporarily) but not harm the grass.
     
  3. JWK

    JWK Gardener

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    • Informative Informative x 2
    • TheMadHedger

      TheMadHedger Gardener

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      Thanks very much. So a selective weedkiller won't kill the nettles completely?
       
    • pete

      pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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      I think if I just wanted to plant trees, I'd be inclined to just strim the nettles back, plant the trees and keep strimming.
      Or better still mowing, they wont like it.:smile:
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
      • TheMadHedger

        TheMadHedger Gardener

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        Maybe I'll do that then - mowing is likely to be easiest as the cordoned off nettle patch is much too far away for a mains extension lead and I only have an electric strimmer. Petrol mower it is then! :)

        Just out of interest will regular, low cut mowing actually kill nettles, perhaps in a few months?
         
      • JWK

        JWK Gardener

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        It will take longer than that, depends on how well established they are and how bumpy the area is i.e. if you can mow very low and regularly then the nettles might disappear within a year.
         
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        • TheMadHedger

          TheMadHedger Gardener

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