Trailing wall plant for conservatory

Discussion in 'Other Plants' started by maggiev, Aug 19, 2014.

  1. maggiev

    maggiev Gardener

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    Trailing plant for a wall container in my unheated conservatory. Very cold in winter, red hot in summer. Any suggestions please. I have thought of ivy or tradescantia, what do others think.
    I will look after it but is going to have to be a toughie. Thanks.
     
  2. Marley Farley

    Marley Farley Affable Admin! Staff Member

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    Well Ivy is an obvious choice but you might get away with a. Jasminum officinale.. That is quite hardy and a beautiful scent when in flower..
     
  3. maggiev

    maggiev Gardener

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    Thanks Marley, I will have a look at that as a possibility.
     
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    • Kristen

      Kristen Under gardener

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      Does it have to be so cold in winter and, more importantly, baking hot in Summer?

      How come extension-conservatory-builders never put any ventilation into their structures thereby making totally unusable spaces come Summer?
       
    • Marley Farley

      Marley Farley Affable Admin! Staff Member

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      If it was heated in winter you could have a Hoya, these are fantastic plants.. https://www.rhs.org.uk/Advice/Profile?pid=824
      Half of them have no idea about ventilation Kristen.. When a friend had her conservatory added they were amazed at how many opening windows she wanted.. Mind you hers is the most wonderful "plant room" now.. It reminds one of the Victorian and Edwardian conservatories... I will have to get a pic next time I am there..
       
    • Kristen

      Kristen Under gardener

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      Its just plain wrong that they get away with that approach IMHO. :sad:

      We're having a Conservatory and Orangery built. The windows & doors are on and, mostly, closed whilst the workers are doing stuff (there and elsewhere on site) and the temperature in there is comfortable. The Orangery has high-up wide-and-not-tall windows at the back that will let hot air out by convection, and low down openable windows at the front (and some openable Velux in the roof)

      The Conservatory has openable windows and a "lantern" roof which also has small landscape windows in it which will let heat out of the top.

      By the by, it seems to me to beggar belief, but the Velux has a solar powered & remote control opening system which is programmable - I imagine that, given the small fortune they cost, they are the "top of the range" and the programming facility offers things like:
      • Retract blinds and open windows, both slowly and over a period of time, to wake you gently in the morning.
      • Close if it rains
      • Open at specific times of the day
      • Air the room (open for a brief period only)
      ... and so on ...

      ... "Open if temperature exceeds XX degrees"? Nope :thud:
       
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      • longk

        longk Total Gardener

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        We can assume then that it will not be in a large pot, so it will need to be rather drought tolerant.
        Aeschynanthus Mona Lisa takes heat and cold (if pretty much dry over the winter)..................
        [​IMG]

        The same goes for Aeschynanthus marmoratus........................
        [​IMG]

        [​IMG]

        Not too sure about Aeschynanthus speciosus as I never grew it in a conservatory.................
        [​IMG]

        Ceropegia woodii..................
        [​IMG]

        Why does that surprise you! It would only surprise me if there wasn't an app available to keep you up to date with what it's doing, probably by way of its own Twitter account!!:heehee:
         
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        • maggiev

          maggiev Gardener

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        • maggiev

          maggiev Gardener

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          They look really interesting, what type of plant are they. What is their natural habitat.
          Thanks Maggie
           
        • longk

          longk Total Gardener

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          The names are above them.

          The Aeschynanthus are from SE Asia. I used to grow the first two under fairly similar conditions (upwards of 45°c in the summer if I went to work forgetting to leave the doors open when I went to work). The cool winter spell encourages blooming in the spring.
          The Ceropegia is from southern Africa and grows at quite high altitudes in places. It just went dormant over the winter for me.
           
        • pete

          pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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          I think its up to you to tell them how much ventilation you want, if you dont say they will provide the minimum as its cheaper for them.

          I think you will struggle to find a plant that suits the situation you have, but I do grow sedum morganianum, "burrows tail" in mine, along with aporocactus flagelliformis.
          But mine is heated in winter.
           
        • Kristen

          Kristen Under gardener

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          Indeed,and so it seems, but surely they are the professionals and the client has no/limited skills in that area, and thus I think there should be a duty of care on the Supplier to inform the Client about the likely effects of limited ventilation. If the Client says No to ventilation then that's fine, but I think the currently accepted practice of not attempting to even alert the Client to the issue is nuts. We seem to be living in a race-to-the-bottom era on so many fronts ...
           
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