Underplanting or pruning roses?

Discussion in 'Roses' started by Monsclara, Aug 14, 2012.

  1. Monsclara

    Monsclara Camera shy!

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    Hi everyone

    I have a couple of climbing roses in a south facing border. Both are reasonably healthy, but one looks very bare - its a bit difficult to see the blossom as it's white. I'd like some advice on how I can address the bareness. Is it possible to cut back very hard or will that kill it off? It strikes me that as its a climber, this is unlikely to work.
    The other possibility is to underplant, but I'm sure what to plant. Would be great if there are any suggestions, thanks

    White climbing rose.jpg
     
  2. Jenny namaste

    Jenny namaste Total Gardener

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    I'm wondering what depth of soil its roots are in? They like depth. If you do prune back hard, to encourage more stems to form from lower down, it will need an incentive - like a Rose feed or well rotted manure or Blood, fish and bone over winter and into next Spring. I would not cut back hard now as new growth will not have time to harden before the colder weather arrives. A rose expert( I'm not really) will be along to help as well,
    Jenny namaste
     
  3. Monsclara

    Monsclara Camera shy!

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    Hi Jenny, thanks.
    The roses are there probably 10ish years - perhaps that gives an idea of root depth? I'm a pretty awful gardener and I'd be worried that I wouldn't maintain properly thru' winter if I cut back hard. Maybe it's safer to underplant. When you say a rose expert will be along, does that mean another forum member?
    I have another rose question about planting a clematis to go through a well established climber. I'll post it later when I can take a pic of the rose.
    Have a good day:)
     
  4. Loofah

    Loofah Well used member

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    You need horizontals for more flowers. The straight up branches are just acting as a courier for the plant nutrients, ie straight to top, rather than branching out.
    Chop one upright to an outward facing bud or leaf node and train the new growth horizontally.
    As far as I recall roses don;t like having competition right next to them but I could be wrong
     
  5. Monsclara

    Monsclara Camera shy!

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    Hi Andy
    I'll have a look at the rose when I get home to see where I could cut and train it and keep you posted.
    About the competition, are you referring to planting the clematis to intertwine?
    Monica
     
  6. Loofah

    Loofah Well used member

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    Anything really. Both clematis and roses like to be deep planted but you will probably gt away with a shallower planted shrub.
     
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