Viburnum “Charles Lamont”

Discussion in 'Other Plants' started by Jocko, Jul 30, 2022.

  1. Jocko

    Jocko Guided by my better half.

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    I have a Viburnum “Charles Lamont” in my shrubbery. We planted it last year, it did well, flowered in the spring, but now the leaves look rather desiccated and on the turn.
    It seems rather early for leaves to go over (the Viburnum Opulus at the other end of the shrubbery is fine and green) so I am worried we have a problem. It may be down to the very dry weather, though it has been kept well watered. When should I expect it to start shedding leaves as for a normal autumn? Should I be worried about it?
     
  2. Jocko

    Jocko Guided by my better half.

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    Now I am worried about it. My Viburnum “Charles Lamont” appears to be well into autumn with the leaves dry, curled and crispy, though they haven't started to drop. My Flannel bush, about six feet away, has started to go the same way. They have not been allowed to dry out and my Dahlias around them are looking fine. I just hope it is early onset "Fall".
     
  3. pete

    pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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    Usually if brown leaves stay attached it means the wood is dead in all but a few cases.
    Give the bark a scratch and see if its nice and green underneath.
     
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    • Jocko

      Jocko Guided by my better half.

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      I'll do that. I do not know what could have killed it. It is not weedkiller, my neighbours don't worry about weeds plus all the plants around it are fit and healthy. It flowered beautifully in the spring and looked great for most of the summer with new shoots springing up from the base. It is just recently it has gone this way.
       
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      • Jocko

        Jocko Guided by my better half.

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        I gave the bark a scratch this morning and it is lovely and green underneath. Perhaps it thinks it is the onset of Autumn. Our weather this year is enough to confuse any living thing.
         
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        • pete

          pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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          Worth leaving then and see what happens.
           
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          • Nikolaos

            Nikolaos Total Gardener

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            Don't think one can really compare a bodnantense to an opulus @Jocko, they flower at completely different times of the year. :dunno: Anyway, the point of this post is mainly to say that my bodnantense 'Dawn' took a couple of years to settle in and could look a tad ropey at times, but has looked very healthy since (it's about 5-6 years old now). :) They seem to be very sensitive to insufficient moisture in the soil when juvenile and what's happening with the leaves is possibly a delayed effect of the drought we suffered earlier. Interestingly, pollinators hardly ever bother with the larger Winter/early Spring flowers but the insignificant Summer ones seem to be becoming increasingly popular with them!

            Nick
             
          • Jocko

            Jocko Guided by my better half.

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            That is why I asked the question in the first place. I have never grown Viburnum, in any form, before and I was worried about this one.
            The bodnantense flowered at the beginning of March and the opulus about three weeks later.
             
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