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Water feature ambitious plan

Discussion in 'Water Gardening' started by Ntate Ngaka, May 18, 2021.

  1. Ntate Ngaka

    Ntate Ngaka Apprentice Gardener

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    Hi all. I've joined the forum to try to get a sense of the magnitude of our water feature plans. And to get, and use, all the experience of those of you that have been here before.

    The garden, not very large, is on a slope. Much of the slope had to be excavated out to provide a level base for the house we built. That has left a 'cliff' of nearly 3 metres at its highest, but coming down to house/patio level at the side. We have a vision, then, of a stream or watercourse running from the highest point, with a few gentle twists and turns and occasional drops, along the edge of the cliff, wending its way down to a small 'pond' - probably an old sink or water trough, at just above patio level. This would empty into a hidden reservoir, and be pumped up to the top through concealed 25mm pipe.

    I know there'll be lots of moments to stop and work out 'best ways' to achieve each step. But two topics initially: firstly, the best way to create the stream, which (for practical reasons) will have to be mostly raised. In other words can't be just excavated into the ground. Secondly the pump. I imagine that LV pumps would not be up to having a 3 metre head. And, are pumps adjustable, so that the rate of flow can be set anywhere from a tiny trickle, to a raging torrent!?

    All initial comments very welcome, and if/when the project gets going, I'll likely be back for more help and advice, not to mention encouragement.
     
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    • wiseowl

      wiseowl Friendly Owl ADMIN Staff Member

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      Good morning @Ntate Ngaka and a warm welcome to Gardeners Corner my friend I am sure you will get all the help and advice you need:smile:

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      • pete

        pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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        Some pictures of the slope and the intended positioning of the waterway would help, not something I have ever done, so cant help that much, but I think you are going to need a reasonably powerful pump for a 3 metre lift.

        Do you want the stream to look like a natural feature or a formal feature?

        I'm sure you will get ideas thrown at you, but it will be up to you in the end how you do it.:smile:
         
      • Sian in Belgium

        Sian in Belgium Total Gardener

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        Welcome to the forum...

        This sounds like a wonderful idea!

        Was it Geoff Hamilton who did a “stream” down a slope in his garden? I seem to remember him saying that it was important to design it so it was a series of inter-connected pools, with mini waterfalls or cascades, rather than a flowing stream. This was so that it would work/cope with the pump being turned off...

        I have a basic pump in my wooden barrel. Around the 30€ mark, as I remember, and it has a simple valve to regulate the flow...

        I hope that helps?
         
      • JWK

        JWK Gardener Staff Member

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        I think some pumps may have adjustable water flows, they will be at the expensive end of the range. I have a much smaller feature and I adjust the water flow with a valve.

        You would need to calculate the water flow and head for your situation. Even with my smaller feature LV didn't have the required power.
         
      • Ntate Ngaka

        Ntate Ngaka Apprentice Gardener

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        Yes, I guess a valve would be the best way to regulate the flow. I meant to suggest, or get re-affirmed, that an LV pump powered by solar would be unlikely to generate the sort of lift required. Anyhow, the intended position for the pump is very close to another outdoor source of mains, so no issues with that.
        My first move is to get an old water trough/shallow sink as a starter. I've seen advice that it's best to develop and build from the bottom end upwards, improvising as you go.
         
      • mazambo

        mazambo Forever Learning

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        When I did something similar many years ago I used broken up paving to give me a basic base and you can see how it's going to look and move it about, when you're done you can cement pieces to give you a raised edge and cover the liner if that's what you're going to use, when it was done and planted up it looked quite good. I bought a jebao pf 3000 pump recently it seems quite powerful and comes with various connectors and a flow valve, the pf 4000 lifts up to 3.6m so I think that would do and is reasonably priced. I don't think solar would do.
         
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