What Veg do you sow direct vs. raise plants?

Discussion in 'Edible Gardening' started by Kristen, Mar 13, 2013.

  1. Kristen

    Kristen Under gardener

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2006
    Messages:
    17,405
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Suffolk, UK
    Ratings:
    +12,380
    Dandanuk asked me about raising vegetable plants to them plant out. It got me thinking as to what vegetable plants is it necessary/worthwhile to raise and then plant out (either in a nursery bed, or because they are tender and need a flying start in a greenhouse etc.)
    I was thinking that, for advice to a Newbie, it might be worth suggetsing they buy the "raised plants" from a garden centre in the first year or two.

    The categories that occurred to me:

    Always raise indoors

    Plants raised in small pots / modules to plant outside because the plants are tender and need their growing season extending:

    Sweetcorn
    Tomatoes (outdoor)
    Runner Beans
    Courgettes / Squash

    Only raise indoors for early crop

    Plants that can readily by sown outdoors, but for early crops you might start some off early "indoors"

    Lettuce

    Raise as transplants in nursery bed

    Plants to transplant - hardy, so can be grown outside in a nursery bed and then transplanted, but often available to buy at a stall on Market Day:

    Leeks
    Brassicas (Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower)

    Plants you might buy from Garden Centre / Nursery

    Plants that might be bought from Garden Centre - for example if a sowing of seed failed and time was running out. These would also lend themselves to being started off under-cover if you wanted to:

    Beetroot
    Leaf Beet
    Broad Beans

    Things you would only ever sow direct in the ground

    Things that are better off grown directly in the ground - e.g. they hate being transplanted

    Carrots
    Parsnips
    (roots in general)
    Onions (from Sets)
    Garlic

    Here are the categories if you have suggestions for any other varieties, thanks.

    Always raise indoors
    Only raise indoors for early crop
    Raise as transplants in nursery bed
    Plants you might buy from Garden Centre / Nursery
    Things you would only ever sow direct in the ground
     
    • Useful Useful x 4
    • Like Like x 3
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • dandanuk

      dandanuk Gardener

      Joined:
      Mar 8, 2013
      Messages:
      105
      Gender:
      Male
      Location:
      Leeds
      Ratings:
      +40
      That's very helpful and it's something I will be taking in, thanks for that Kirsten :ThankYou:
       
    • Kristen

      Kristen Under gardener

      Joined:
      Jul 22, 2006
      Messages:
      17,405
      Gender:
      Male
      Location:
      Suffolk, UK
      Ratings:
      +12,380
      My pleasure.

      But I'm relying on others chirping up with other things that would fit into the various categories. I've despatched the Lads with Baseball Bats in the Gardeners Corner Black Van, so I expect the others will be chipping in Real Soon Now :)
       
      • Funny Funny x 2
      • pete

        pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

        Joined:
        Jan 9, 2005
        Messages:
        31,944
        Gender:
        Male
        Occupation:
        Retired
        Location:
        Mid Kent
        Ratings:
        +39,643
        After reading the OP.
        I cant think of a single thing to say:)
         
      • Freddy

        Freddy Miserable git, well known for it

        Joined:
        Jul 15, 2007
        Messages:
        9,233
        Gender:
        Male
        Occupation:
        Retired - yay!
        Location:
        Bristol
        Ratings:
        +11,925
        I'm confused, it don't take much!:scratch: :redface:
         
        • Funny Funny x 1
        • Phil A

          Phil A Guest

          Ratings:
          +0
          Indoors : Chillies, Peppers, Aubergines.

          Early Crop indoors : Spring sown Garlic, Peas, Beetroot.

          Direct Sowing : Pak Choi, Fennel.
           
        • Kristen

          Kristen Under gardener

          Joined:
          Jul 22, 2006
          Messages:
          17,405
          Gender:
          Male
          Location:
          Suffolk, UK
          Ratings:
          +12,380
          Do you then plant them outside Zigs, or do they stay in the greenhouse?
           
        • shiney

          shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

          Joined:
          Jul 3, 2006
          Messages:
          48,209
          Gender:
          Male
          Occupation:
          Retired - Last Century!!!
          Location:
          Herts/Essex border. Zone 8b
          Ratings:
          +86,989
          The GC Black Van got stopped by Shineyland border control but they passed the message on to me. :heehee:

          I agree with your list, Kristen :dbgrtmb: and with Zigs - chillies etc remain in greenhouse.

          Your post on the other thread was spot on. We grow all of those under cover and in pots etc. Some of the plants (mainly beans) we grow a large amount of extras to account for replacement of slug damage. Any over, get sold. The only difference is that I don't use the type of bulb planter you do - mine is called Mrs Shiney :heehee:
           
        • Scrungee

          Scrungee Well known for it

          Joined:
          Dec 5, 2010
          Messages:
          15,744
          Location:
          Central England on heavy clay soil
          Ratings:
          +27,015
          I sow all my peas in modules and plant out when a couple of inches high for 2 reasons, I have heavy, wet, cold clay soil, and also to keep mice away from them before they're established, the latter also for French and Runner Beans.
           
          • Agree Agree x 1
          • Kristen

            Kristen Under gardener

            Joined:
            Jul 22, 2006
            Messages:
            17,405
            Gender:
            Male
            Location:
            Suffolk, UK
            Ratings:
            +12,380
            Have you considered growing them in a gutter? (and then just sliding the whole contents of the gutter out into a preprepared mini-trench to plant out?

            I've read of it, but not tried it. I guess the theory is that it is easier to keep the gutter high up, to foil attempts for mouse attack.
             
          • Scrungee

            Scrungee Well known for it

            Joined:
            Dec 5, 2010
            Messages:
            15,744
            Location:
            Central England on heavy clay soil
            Ratings:
            +27,015
            Too unwieldy to transport from home to my plot in a wheel barrow (because the track will be too muddy). Much easier to stack modular trays in blue plastic mushroom boxes.
             
          • Kristen

            Kristen Under gardener

            Joined:
            Jul 22, 2006
            Messages:
            17,405
            Gender:
            Male
            Location:
            Suffolk, UK
            Ratings:
            +12,380
            Ah ... yes, hadn't considered veg patch being at an allotment. Sorry about that :)
             
          • JWK

            JWK Gardener

            Joined:
            Jun 3, 2008
            Messages:
            20,853
            Gender:
            Male
            Location:
            Surrey
            Ratings:
            +23,790
            I always start off an early batch of Runner Beans in small pots and grow them on in the greenhouse before hardening off outside, as per Kristen's advice.

            Then I usually direct sow another batch in early June. At that time of year the soil is warm enough for them to germinate fast. These later sown plants extend the picking season.
             
          • Kristen

            Kristen Under gardener

            Joined:
            Jul 22, 2006
            Messages:
            17,405
            Gender:
            Male
            Location:
            Suffolk, UK
            Ratings:
            +12,380
            have you tried sowing-a-seed in the hole where you plant-the-plant, so the second crop comes up amongst the first?

            My Runners always seem to last until first frost, its my Climbing French that give up early, and them that I sow-a-seed at planting time to extend the cropping.
             
          • JWK

            JWK Gardener

            Joined:
            Jun 3, 2008
            Messages:
            20,853
            Gender:
            Male
            Location:
            Surrey
            Ratings:
            +23,790
            No I sow the seed a few inches away from the newly planted bean, to give them both a chance to spread out their roots.

            By the end of the season I'm finding that only the tops of my beans are still flowering/producing pods, so I'm trying to get the later plants to produce pods lower down.
             
          Loading...

          Share This Page

          1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
            By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
            Dismiss Notice