which tree?

Discussion in 'Trees' started by lbsnoop, Feb 12, 2006.

  1. lbsnoop

    lbsnoop Apprentice Gardener

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    Any suggested for a nice wee tree for my front garden, nothing to big, maybe 8 feet or so in height. Garden gets a bit of sun and is protected on two sides by a wall and a fence
     
  2. SteveW

    SteveW Gardener

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    I like to see Japanese acers in front gardens, the foliage looks good and the protected garden should make sure it doesn't get wind burn

    the variety palmatum atropurpurium 'bloodgood' is a good one

    http://www.chrispattison.fsnet.co.uk/cp/acers.htm
     
  3. hans

    hans Gardener

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    You could always put a fruit tree in blossom in spring apples, plums, pears late summer. I personally don't like the flowering cherry type of tree all over in flash and what a mess it makes and there seems to be one around every corner. The japanese acers do look well.
     
  4. Fran

    Fran Gardener

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    or Magnolia stellata - pretty shape and lovely flowers.
     
  5. PeterS

    PeterS Total Gardener

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    Steve. I think Acer Bloodgood is absolutely fabulous. There are two magnificent specimens near me in the RHS Harlow Carr gardens, which go a fantastic dark red colour in autumn. But they are about 15 foot high. I wonder if this is too tall. Mind you they will take a long time to get there.

    I reluctantly went for one a bit smaller - still very nice though.
     
  6. UsedtobeDendy

    UsedtobeDendy Gardener

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    salix 'hakuro nishiki' is nice. weeping willow that doesn't get very big, but has very nice colours - used a lot down south, but will grow pretty much anywhere, and doesn't cost too muc. Willows are easy to take cuttings of too - so you could end up with hundreds!
     
  7. SteveW

    SteveW Gardener

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    A sport taken from that called 'flamingo' is also nice, as is the salix kilmarnock range
     
  8. dalbuie

    dalbuie Gardener

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    We had a kilmarnock willow in our last garden, very pretty pussy willow catkins. [​IMG]
     
  9. frogesque

    frogesque Gardener

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    I like the idea of an acer or an ornamental apple (malus) but if you want something really different you could try a Bottle Brush Tree (Callistemon citrinus or C. subulatus) They do have a reputation for being frost tender (sabulatus is more hardy) but have been known to come through -10C and I have seen one growing up here in Scotland so as long as the site is reasonably sunny and well sheltered it might be worth a try. 1-3m tall, can also be trained up a sunny wall.

    Another possible would be a Mock Orange (Philadelphus) Most but not all varieties are highly scented so make sure you get one in flower. More of a shrub than a tree but will grow to 2.5m. Suitable for sun or part shade and will tollerate chalky soils. Should take most anything a British climate can throw at it except direct salt spray
     
  10. Fran

    Fran Gardener

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    The golden variety of philadelphus is beautiful in the spring with its acid yellow leaves - and takes heavy pruning after flowering.
     
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