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Solved Can anyone identify these rock plants?

Discussion in 'Identification Area' started by groundbeetle, Dec 4, 2021.

  1. groundbeetle

    groundbeetle Gardener

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    Can anyone identify these rock plants, especially the feathery leaved one?

    One pot is labelled Sempervivum mix, the second pot, with the feathery leaved plant and something else growing in the same pot, is labelled Sedum mix. I am also curious what the other plant is growing in the same pot as the feathery leaved "Sedum Mix", whether it is something nice or a weed I need to be careful with.

    They are both bought from Morrisons, their labels describing them as Rockery Perennials.0ADE61CD-26D7-40B8-A3BC-0822F5F9C455.jpeg5E284BA3-7289-428A-B561-72073D4D09AF.jpeg6B0C2BEE-8CFB-4F5F-B6C5-530DD0B305CC.jpeg
     
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    • flounder

      flounder Gardener

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      sempervivum, sedum. Just like Morrisons said!
      As for the variety, google might be your friend. There looks like there is some toadflax in with the sedum which is pretty, if somewhat invasive
      edit
      and some bittercress
       
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      • groundbeetle

        groundbeetle Gardener

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        Thanks. Morrisons don't specify the variety. I will look up toadflax and bittercress.

        My wild flowers book has many kinds of Bittercress, the most likely, I think, is Hairy Bittercress, Cardamine hirsuta, or Wavy Bittercress, Cardamine flexuosa.
         
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          Last edited: Dec 4, 2021
        • JWK

          JWK Gardener Staff Member

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          It's Hairy Bittercress a very invasive weed.
           
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          • groundbeetle

            groundbeetle Gardener

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            Thank you. I will carefully separate it from the Sedum before I plant it in the ground.

            I will probably transplant the Sedum to a bigger pot after weeding it, and wait and see if any more Hairy Bittercress grow. I suppose I just need to make sure it doesn't flower and set seed, and also there could be seeds in its soil. It doesn't look like it would spread through underground rhizomes, it looks like one of those things that throws out a lot of seeds.

            If it is a typical Sedum it will spread a lot, and be very easy to grow cuttings from.
             
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              Last edited: Dec 4, 2021
            • JWK

              JWK Gardener Staff Member

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              Yes the seed pods explode and scatter their contents a few feet. They are not near that stage so just pull them out root and all.
               
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              • pete

                pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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                I find that unusual as I've bought plants from Morrisons but I have never found weeds in the pots.
                You normally only find weeds in plants that have hung around for a bit outside in garden centers.
                 
              • groundbeetle

                groundbeetle Gardener

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                Morrisons are brilliant for plants, their quality is usually excellent, and these only cost me £1 each. It is probably a bad time of year to be buying rockery plants. It is no problem as long as I know what I am dealing with and I can pull the weeds out, it will probably be a nice plant, maybe some kind of trailing Sedum.
                 
              • flounder

                flounder Gardener

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                the sempervivum is probably tectorum, they are so variable, that a positive i.d. of the exact cultivar could be nigh on impossible.
                The sedum could be acre. Once again, quite variable. Hope this helps.
                Both are so, so easy to propagate but both are invaluable for the rockery/ground cover type thing
                 
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