Climbing Rose Not Flowering

Discussion in 'Roses' started by Tabbee, Aug 8, 2020.

  1. Tabbee

    Tabbee Apprentice Gardener

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    Hi all,

    I’ve had a climbing rose (not sure what type) that’s really hardy and self sufficient in my garden for over 10 years, which grows along an archway. It always has a mass of flowers in the summer, although last year there were no flowers, so I cut the rose a few inches from the ground earlier this year to see if that helped with this season’s flowering. I’ve got loads of vigorous growth and healthy green leaves, but again no buds or flowers.

    On the other side of the same arch (it’s really wide), I have another type of climbing rose and two clematis plants which are flowering really well, and were all cut back at the same time as the problem rose. I’ve noticed that the non-flowering rose has grown under my fence into next-doors garden, and annoyingly is flowering well there, with definitely no care, tending, feeding etc. taking place over there.

    Recently though I’ve noticed some of my rose on the arch has some white (mould?) marks on the leaves, so am wondering if this is connected to the flowering issues or is an unrelated issue, and if anyone has any ideas what this could be and how to resolve this?

    Thank you! :)

    Images:

    1. The other side of the arch with a flowering climbing rose and clematis
    2. The growth of the non-flowering rose
    3 & 4. White marks on the non-flowering rose leaves
    5. The rose that’s flowering in next-doors garden

    4A63D2A3-311B-4D81-BF3F-0928C4DB747D.jpeg98B87173-5167-4329-A34F-90CA5C013B5F.jpeg1CF9753D-9026-46E8-BED0-20702C57DE84.jpegF146579E-C049-46BB-92AD-588CE849136A.jpegE703C1B1-C7CC-4526-BF98-B0AEDCF900CE.jpeg
     
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    • noisette47

      noisette47 Total Gardener

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      Hello Tabbee, Firstly, the white powdery stuff is probably mildew. Roses are susceptible during very dry conditions. If you can find a systemic fungicide (perhaps Roseclear?) give the soil a thorough soaking. If there are not too many stems and leaves affected, I'd snip them off and dispose of them so they don't infect any more.
      Perhaps your non-flowering rose is a variety that flowers on older, ripened wood? I'd tie in 3 or 4 healthy stems to the arch, take out any surplus at the base, give it a high potash feed such as Tomorite and give it time. The other tip to encourage flowering is to gently bend the stems so they're as horizontal as possible. This works best with roses that have got rambler 'blood' in them. They're more flexible.
      Next time you prune, just take out one or two stems but leave some of this year's. Then each year, take out the oldest stems only.
       
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      • Tabbee

        Tabbee Apprentice Gardener

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        Thank you so much for your advice, I’ll try this and hopefully I’ll have some flowers next year :)
         
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        • Mike Allen

          Mike Allen Total Gardener

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          Sound advice, but in all honesty I have never in my career come across, certain roses flowering on whatever years growth. No offence.

          What can so often happen. The gardener/grower becomes so engrossed in the vitality of the plant. It's amazing, look at how it's growing and growing. For some reason in such cases. There may be a botanical confusion. (Well you've got to blame someone) Joking apart. Plant breeding can have many ups and downs.

          INMO here the gardener/grower must decide. If I may, quote my own daughter. Basically she hates cutting anything away and dumping it. A recent rose that I bought for her is named after a hospital friend of mum's. Much to her delight it has grown fast and has to date, over a hundred blooms. The rose is. Lavinia. It's growth is rapid and in a season most of the stems can be 0-75 inches thick. Now for rose growers, good stron growth is most valid. Howver this rose is amongst several that require human intervention.

          Take a look at the stems. Perhaps, even last years stems look aged. This is important. You have to be cruel to be kind. Set yourself a height limit. You want to enjoy the flowers. Now consider the main stems. Be careful, be selective. Observe what new or fairly new growth there is, now look at that very thick stem....looks as if it's been there for ages. Dicide if it's time to cut this one out. Always think, picture the futere and act.
           
        • Tabbee

          Tabbee Apprentice Gardener

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          Sorry for the delay in getting back to you. This is really good advice thank you, I’ll try these ideas and fingers crossed for flowers next year! :)
           
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          • ARMANDII

            ARMANDII Low Flying Administrator Staff Member

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            I believe that Noisette's advice is spot on, Tabbee. Could I ask if you have been feeding the Rose
            at all:scratch: Roses are notoriously hungry feeders and will respond rapidly to a weekly feed of a high Potash fertiliser, say, something like Tomato Feed.
            I have a 40 year old Rose "King's Ransom" which has always struggled with my sandy soil and out of the 22 - 26 mixture of Roses in the garden is the one that always needs a constant feed of high Potash feriliser to get it to flower but, as it has so many memories attached to it, I will never abandon it or get rid of it!!:love30: All my other Rose flower well but only because I do appreciate that they are always hungry.
            [​IMG]

            Well, to the Rose there are no man made boundaries so it's not differentiating between your garden and the Neighbours. So, it sounds like it is putting all it's energy in the new growth on the other side of your fence!!. To, solve that situation I would advise cutting through the Rose's roots by the fence thereby separating your Rose and what is, in effect, the Neighbour's. That will stop the parent plant putting energy into it's extension and concentrate on it's own growing and flowering. I would also recommend strongly that, after you've separated the two plants, giving it a feed of high Potash........but, if you're not able to separate the plants by severing the roots before the end of August I would not feed your Rose until the Spring and when new growth appears. But, I would definitely separate the what is now two Roses by cutting through those roots disappearing under the fence otherwise I think your problem will just continue.:cat-kittyandsmiley::coffee:
             
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