Feeding Laylandii

Discussion in 'Trees' started by Paul4321, Jan 2, 2021.

  1. Paul4321

    Paul4321 Apprentice Gardener

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    We have planted around 40 Laylandii down one end of the garden which we are hoping to Eventually get to around 7ft in height. I planted a year or so ago and they have reached around two foot in height now. We live in a very exposed windy area so to get a good root I planted them at around 8-10” in height. I have never fed them and I was looking at them today wondering if I should and if so, if there was anything I could feed them to accelerate growth? Bearing in mind there are 40 I need a cheap feed. Also grass is growing around them...should I get rid of grass around them?

    Thanks,
    Paul
     
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    • noisette47

      noisette47 Total Gardener

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      Hello Paul, I wouldn't! They'll take you by surprise in the spring and before you know what's hit you they'll be up to 10'! Certainly, it will help to suppress the competition from grass and weeds. Especially in summer when they'd be competing for moisture.
       
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      • flounder

        flounder Gardener

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        I'm not helping by saying, the only feeding I would do is them into a shredder! (I'm not a fan)
        They do make a very good wind break though and sounds like you have the room for them. I personally would give them a very light haircut. This will help to bush 'em up a bit. The cheapest feed you could give them, is the grass clippings as a mulch. It will suppress weeds, keep a bit more moisture in and be a source of nitrogen
         
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        • ricky101

          ricky101 Total Gardener

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          Hi,

          Have used them before to create such a screen and they can be readliy trimmed to remain at 6 to 7 ft. When the tip of leader is at the desired height in spring, cut it back by at least a foot so it bushes out.

          However on there own not that attractive, depending on your view, so we interplanted with Pyracantha, Honeysuckle, Winter Jasmine and even some Clematis and Roses to add more year round colour. Quiet surprised how well they all intertwined and looked.

          It also helps cover over things if a Leylandii plant fails or turns brown, which can ruin the effect of a Leylandii only hedge, always worth growing the odd one or two in pots so you can replace any failing plants.
           
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          • Scudo

            Scudo Gardener

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            Also keep a watch on the width as once they get too wide if you cut back to brown wood it stays that way, they can be kept at a reasonable height and width with probably trimming twice a year.
            In my previous house I kept a 30 foot long hedge at 7` high and only 2` wide, it looked tidy but glad to have left it behind.
             
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            • Mike Allen

              Mike Allen Total Gardener

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              Everyone to their own. Problem with growing trees of any kind in the garden is. We don't always choose the right one for that particular spot. Then comes the matter of careing for it.

              Leylandii is a fast grower. To plant and grow as a hedge, I'd be inclined to plant a double, if not treble offset rows. The practise will be to keep the whole lot looking fresh and young. So regarding feeding. I'd stick to a fairly high nitrogen feed.
               
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                Last edited: Jan 4, 2021
              • BFOSP

                BFOSP Gardener

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                I realise that some might disagree with this but a bucket full of road salt round the base will sort them out.
                My brothers NDN set a row at the road verge up as far as my bros drive. As they grew it made the drive a blind pull out. The salt round the first two plants sorted things and the conversation that summer was along the lines of; "Funny how those end ones just went brown."
                 
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                • DianneW

                  DianneW Keen Gardener

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                  [​IMG]
                  Took this photo just recently of the big Tree. has to be cut back like that because just inches away from the overhead electricity lines...in fact looking at it from here some little thin branches are touching it...The tree is very old and I do not know what it is..Would be great for shade, that is very much needed here in the Summer months but we have to keep it away from the wires...Each year a helicopter comes around the district and last year it kept coming back to our garden round a few times and off it went..Several days later we got a letter giving us options to cut back the Tree in the photo and also the large Conifers near our driveway....The service on offer is 'free' they cut, drop and leave , we were caught out with that service the first year we move here and the garden was partly wrecked as they raped the row of trees in the back garden down our boundary to the right side of the back garden.
                  We knew also that the overhead wires were due to be removed at some stage..We sat on the notice, time past a few months and the electricity changes had started nearby.Lots of new concrete posts were put in and the wiring and all the gubbings were all changed for new ones..Then we had a notice from the electricity company of their intentions. We had wiring through our Conifers that was soon gone and wiring through the boundary to the right back garden the row of trees can now be happy growing trees at last. The old post that held the wiring(in next door's garden) is still there because their jungle was preventing any access for safl removal of it...Job in the thinking stage now...
                  Would you believe it, we then got another letter offering to remove the branches too close to the cables.... wiring all gone.:wallbanging: ... Except the one in the Photo of course.:catapult:

                  I wonder what went through their minds when they installed the cables as that Tree was there 1st......
                   
                  Last edited: Jan 4, 2021
                • Cuttings

                  Cuttings Super Gardener

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                  Other than cutting them down, digging them up, and putting something else there...

                  Leave the tops of the trees until they get to within 6 inches (15cm) of the height you want your hedge to be, then prune them off. This will allow them to branch out to form the top of the hedge. You can do this at any time of the year.
                   
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                  • JR

                    JR Chilled Gardener

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                    I hate leylandii.. They need to be kept trimmed properly because once they are let go they are a disaster for you and any neighbours.
                    I had some at the bottom of the garden years ago and they rendered the land useless for metres around.. always dry and hard.
                    Granted they serve a purpose in some situations, but 'feeding them into a shredder' would be by choice as mentioned earlier!
                    They don't appreciate strong cold winds whilst young, and after easter they will appreciate plenty of water.
                     
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                    • Paul4321

                      Paul4321 Apprentice Gardener

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                      Thanks all for the varied responses.
                      I did not think of mixing a few things in to give some colour and will look at some of the plants ricky101 has used. Neighbours are not a problem as we do not have any. No cables above or near. The trees are a screen to hide a water tank from view (which is in the next field.) The idea of a bit of variant mixed in is good as 40’ of green may be a bit much. Personally I like Laylandii. If you put the work into them they look good in my opinion. Have some already established and the birds love them as well.
                      Anyways thanks everyone for your input. Much appreciated
                      Best regards
                       
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                      • Paul4321

                        Paul4321 Apprentice Gardener

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                        Thanks for advice Cuttings.

                        Do I keep them at the trimmed height until they have branched out? Then let them grow to the height required? They are about 12 inches apart so I am assuming it will take quite a while for them to branch out?

                        Thanks
                        Paul
                         
                      • Cuttings

                        Cuttings Super Gardener

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                        Its been a while since creating a hedge, once, you have got to the height as last post, you can also shape by prunning, so as the individual trees grow, you can remove unwanted growth, I would suggest for March, April, May, apply a high nitrogen feed twice monthly, to create more green growth, then August, September, October apply a 0-10-10 feed to harden the trees up for winter, then year 2, prune late February early march, then repeat year 3 and 4,, you can get almost 1 metre of growth per season, that can be up, or out, once the desired height is reached, its all maintainance, just remember Leylandii will strip the surrounding area of moisture, which you will have to remedy, even the lawn. Just remember, if you wish to burn trimings from this type of evergreen, the sap inside is flammable, so burn small amounts at a time.
                         
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