Heights of plants

Discussion in 'NEW Gardeners !' started by Mark Wingfield, Jun 10, 2024 at 3:37 PM.

  1. Mark Wingfield

    Mark Wingfield Apprentice Gardener

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    I have purchased a selection of perennial plant plugs which are currently in pots.

    I will soon want to plant these in the same area of garden, in rows. The section is the sunniest section.

    Given mistakes with other planting, I would like tge rows to be descending plant heights so that I can see them flowering

    Can anyone give me an idea of expected tallest to smallest. The list is:

    A= Aqullegla Mrs Scott Elllot
    B= Leucanthemum Crazy Dalsy
    C= Geum Lady Stratheden
    D= Digltalls Dalmation Mixed
    E= Coreopsis Golden Joy
    F= DelphInlum Dark Blue & Whlte Bee
    G= Verbena Buenos Aires
    H= Doronicum LIttle Leo
    I= Dianthus Rocking Red
    J= Salvla Salvatore Deep Blue.
    K= Echinacea Nectar PInk
    L= Achillea Cerise Queen
     
  2. Punkdoc

    Punkdoc experienced

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    I think the first thing to think about is flowering time, some of those are Spring flowering, some early summer, and some later.
    The Delphinium and Verbena will be the tallest, but the Verbena is a "see through " so can go at the front of a border. The Digitalis will be the next tallest.
     
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    • ricky101

      ricky101 Total Gardener

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      You also want to go online and look those plants up on the RHS web site and the many plant suppliers so you can see all the relevant details of those plants, eg flowering time, height/spread, colour, sun or shade, dry or wet etc etc.

      Geum is a sneaky one, it looks like a small clump forming plant ideal for the front of the border but it puts up very tall flower spikes that can look totally out of place.
       
    • fairygirl

      fairygirl Head Gardener

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      The problem with heights and spreads is - they're variable because your conditions will dictate how much or how little something grows, and therefore everything is approximate. It can take a few years for any perennial to reach it's full size too.
      A hotter, drier site with sandier soil is very different from a colder, wetter site in clay, and your location/climate is also a factor. Salvias, for example, are very difficult here as the climate really doesn't suit them.
      If you can add your general location to your profile on the left of the page @Mark Wingfield, that will always help with advice. :smile:
       
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