1. Forum News
    VOTING IS NOW OPEN FOR THE SEPTEMBER MONTHLY COMP ( last one for a while) and ALSO THE 30 DAY COMP.., Photo Competitions Are Changing!
    Please Support The Road Verge Campaign!
    Dismiss Notice

Solved Help to identify this plant please

Discussion in 'Identification Area' started by tristanstartsgardening, Jun 3, 2019.

  1. tristanstartsgardening

    tristanstartsgardening Gardener

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2019
    Messages:
    32
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +1
    I found this plant grows rapidly during the sprint/summer time. Could you please help me identify what is it and how to deal with it?

    Thank you.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer PLANTAHOLIC

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2010
    Messages:
    1,932
    Occupation:
    Semi retired amateur plantaholic gardener
    Location:
    PERTHSHIRE. SCOTLAND. UK
    Ratings:
    +1,990
    Much better with clearer pics.
    Looks like a Salix sp...a willow...but not sure which one.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • tristanstartsgardening

      tristanstartsgardening Gardener

      Joined:
      Mar 10, 2019
      Messages:
      32
      Gender:
      Male
      Ratings:
      +1
      Thanks for your reply. I also found this one which looks very similar but the left is bigger. Are the the same plant?
       

      Attached Files:

    • Silver surfer

      Silver surfer PLANTAHOLIC

      Joined:
      Jul 25, 2010
      Messages:
      1,932
      Occupation:
      Semi retired amateur plantaholic gardener
      Location:
      PERTHSHIRE. SCOTLAND. UK
      Ratings:
      +1,990
      6314..has pinnate leaves ...very different from the willow.
      Possibly Sorbus aucuparia...common name Rowan.

      Pics in link below show one single leaf with leaflets.

      sorbus aucuparia leaf - Google Search


      They went to a lot of trouble to plant that hedge with so many different trees in it. How long is this hedge?
       
      • Like Like x 1
      • tristanstartsgardening

        tristanstartsgardening Gardener

        Joined:
        Mar 10, 2019
        Messages:
        32
        Gender:
        Male
        Ratings:
        +1
        Looks like the first plant was planted intentionally as the trunk is quite thick and strong and being trimmed before. The second plant is more likely newly grow there this year and the trunk is more slimmer.

        For the first plant, I guess the only option is to trim as it's already well established. For the second plant, do you recommend try to dig it out given it is still young?

        I also don't like the facts there are so many different trees in the hedge. Will it be a huge effort/cost to remove them completely (they are not very tall yet - the highest is about 1.8m)?
         
      • Silver surfer

        Silver surfer PLANTAHOLIC

        Joined:
        Jul 25, 2010
        Messages:
        1,932
        Occupation:
        Semi retired amateur plantaholic gardener
        Location:
        PERTHSHIRE. SCOTLAND. UK
        Ratings:
        +1,990
        Hedges in countryside are wonderful they are used to separate one field from another.
        They provide shelter. Places for insects, birds, dormice, hedgehogs to hid /nest.
        They provides seeds, nuts, berries food for all wildlife.
        However in a city then it is maybe just a major headache.
        Who trims both sides if it is a boundary?
        Who has the skill to trim the sides and tops regularly?
        Who has the skill to layer them as in the countryside?

        https://www.fotolibra.com/gallery/521452/layered-hedges-at-stoughton/

        I see your problem.

        But again I ask...How long is this.
        Can you post a pic to show it all?
         
        • Agree Agree x 1
        • tristanstartsgardening

          tristanstartsgardening Gardener

          Joined:
          Mar 10, 2019
          Messages:
          32
          Gender:
          Male
          Ratings:
          +1
          I can't capture a picture that shows all those trees. I have uploaded pictures for them individually.

          • Rowan trees are very young and the trunk is still slim (0.5cm). The height is about 1.5 m
          • The ash tree seems being planted in the hedge already as the trunk is strong about 3cm across. The height (including twigs and leaves) is about 1.8m and the trunk is about 1.5m
          • Sycamore's trunk is also strong (about 2cm cross) and the height is about 1.5m
          • Willow's trunk is also strong (about 2cm cross) and the height is (including twigs and leaves) is about 2.3m - the trunk isn't that high but twigs outgrow as you can see from the pictures
          The hedge is at the front garden so no boundary issues. I'm a noob in gardening (you may already tell) so no knowledge and experience of trimming tree sides and tops and let alone layering the hedge.

          From I can tell, the previous maintainer of the hedge have trimmed the twigs/leaves of the tree and ensured the tree is not higher than the hedge. I'd like to do the same if that is the best practice. My questions are:
          • When should I trim the tree? In winter or summer?
          • Should I try to completely remove the young trees (those looks newly grown this year with slim trunks)?
          • Apart from trim the tree, should I also chop the tree to ground level like what you and shiney suggested? If yes, when should I chop them?
          • I am happy to do the trim and chop myself. Given the current state of the hedge, how hard is it to do this myself?
           

          Attached Files:

        • tristanstartsgardening

          tristanstartsgardening Gardener

          Joined:
          Mar 10, 2019
          Messages:
          32
          Gender:
          Male
          Ratings:
          +1
          Thank you for your reply. I have uploaded a few images and posted a few questions. Could you please take a look?
           
        • Silver surfer

          Silver surfer PLANTAHOLIC

          Joined:
          Jul 25, 2010
          Messages:
          1,932
          Occupation:
          Semi retired amateur plantaholic gardener
          Location:
          PERTHSHIRE. SCOTLAND. UK
          Ratings:
          +1,990
          OK ..Front garden/boundary to pavement... ..so if your front garden is similar to one across the street you have a length of hedge 5-6m maybe?????
          This means you are responsible for keeping pavement/footpath clear for walkers, prams, dogs etc.
          Please go across the street and take a pic to show an overview ....house/drive/hedge.
          I don't need to see individual trees.

          I don't want to give any advice until facts are established.
           
        • tristanstartsgardening

          tristanstartsgardening Gardener

          Joined:
          Mar 10, 2019
          Messages:
          32
          Gender:
          Male
          Ratings:
          +1
          Here are a few pictures show the overview. Hope this gives you an idea about how the hedge is layout along the street.
           

          Attached Files:

        • Silver surfer

          Silver surfer PLANTAHOLIC

          Joined:
          Jul 25, 2010
          Messages:
          1,932
          Occupation:
          Semi retired amateur plantaholic gardener
          Location:
          PERTHSHIRE. SCOTLAND. UK
          Ratings:
          +1,990
          Thank you.
          I have added full image so others can see and help.
          (When you add pics just click full images /saves having to click and open each pic )

          So this is a new home, a very young newly planted mixed hedge.
          I have concerns about the large growing trees in the hedge so near to your home/drains/sewers.
          I feel the Fraxinus excelsior...Ash has to go.

          In an urban setting it is virtually impossible to keep a mixed country style hedge looking neat and not encroaching the pavement.

          1. Do you like it?
          2. Are you prepared to trim both sides and top every winter?
          It is a job you can never neglect or the hedge will get out of hand...very tall and straggly
          Once a year trimming might not be enough.
          You will need to think about what you are going to do with twigs/branches you trim.
          Car/trip to nearest council recycling centre...with prickly stuff like Berberis in it.
          OR are you prepared to pay mega bucks to get some one else to do it?

          At this stage it would not be too massive a task to remove all of it....that would be what I would do....but do you want to keep the hedge?

          I hope others will add their thoughts.

          IMG-6328.JPGIMG-6329.JPGIMG-6330.JPGIMG-6331.JPG
           
        • tristanstartsgardening

          tristanstartsgardening Gardener

          Joined:
          Mar 10, 2019
          Messages:
          32
          Gender:
          Male
          Ratings:
          +1
          I do like the berberis part and the bamboo part of my hedge, but the trees inside the hedge (now only in berberies hedges) deter me a bit given the maintenance efforts and potential adverse impacts.

          If I remove all current hedges and plant something else (for instance, yew or box with no large growing trees), I concern tree seeds may invade again and ruin the new hedge. I do curious about how people get rid of trees from their hedges?

          By the way, is there anything maintenance works I can do during summer time? Maybe at least trim tree leaves so berberies can get more rains and sunshine?

          Yeah, I'd also like to hear opinions and comments from others as well.
           
        • longk

          longk Total Gardener

          Joined:
          Nov 24, 2011
          Messages:
          11,096
          Location:
          Oxfordshire
          Ratings:
          +21,889
          That seals it for me - get shot! Bamboo can be invasive. Very invasive. We put bamboo in the garden to provide some privacy and spent the next ten years digging it out of the lawn, rebuilding a wall, removing a shed to get the runners out that were growing through it and avoiding the dark looks of the neighbour who was now sharing our bamboo problem through no fault of their own! It's even worse than Ivy in my opinion.
           
        • ellen9661

          ellen9661 Apprentice Gardener

          Joined:
          Jun 1, 2019
          Messages:
          12
          Ratings:
          +4
          Can anyone help me identify a plant/weed that has large green leaves with white spots and tiny blue and pink flowers
           
        • Silver surfer

          Silver surfer PLANTAHOLIC

          Joined:
          Jul 25, 2010
          Messages:
          1,932
          Occupation:
          Semi retired amateur plantaholic gardener
          Location:
          PERTHSHIRE. SCOTLAND. UK
          Ratings:
          +1,990
          ellen9661...welcome to the forums.
          May I suggest you start a new thread of your own to ask your question.
          Pics would help enormously!
           
        Loading...

        Share This Page

        1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
          By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
          Dismiss Notice