How to /should i hand-pollinate kiwi flowers?

Discussion in 'Edible Gardening' started by karaman, May 29, 2019.

  1. karaman

    karaman Gardener

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    hallo,
    i love kiwi fruit: this is Arguta issai variety: up till now it produced no flowers, i cut it back last year and here we are with a many flowers this year.
    QUESTION
    --- scared chaffinches or others birds will eat them so i thought i'd cover them up but then bees cant get to them so i would have to pollinate them by hand --- piccie of flower attached --- how do i pollinate by hand? do i use a soft brush to stroke the innards of one flower and by doing the same to the next one, does it then pollinate it?
    cheers, karamanKiwi_flower.jpg
     
  2. pete

    pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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  3. ricky101

    ricky101 Super Gardener

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    Hi,

    @pete raises an interesting point, he seems to imply that each flower can self pollintate itself , though have yet to read anything to confirm this ..?

    I wonder if its more that a self fertile plant still needs pollen transfering from one flower to another on the same plant .... ?

    They always say you get better pollination, even with self or semi pollinating types, if you have pollen from another plant, though perhaps not too many kiwis near you ..

    For protection from the birds , yet allowing bees in, use some of this netting, though it needs to be stretched tight to ensure its open enough for the bees, use it on my fruit cage ok.

    001688.jpg
     
  4. misterQ

    misterQ Keen Gardener

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    Yes, I believe issai is self pollinating.

    This is an educated guess, but it can happen if both male and female parts exist in the flower and when it grows, the parts touch or is wind pollinated.

    This pollination mechanism can also benefit from insect pollination from a pollination partner, albeit, I have never seen any bees or other insects visit the flowers of my own Kiwi issai and it still produced very sweet mini kiwi berries.
     
  5. pete

    pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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    I was basically going on the same idea as peaches, which are self fertile.
    You just need the pollen to move from one part of the flower to the other, often a light spray with water on a sunny day will do the job.

    I do realise that there are plants that produce Male and female flowers separately, I must admit I'm not sure if that is the case with kiwifruit.
     
  6. karaman

    karaman Gardener

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    Thank you for all replies, very interesting -- i love the kiwi flowers they are so small and delicate --- will buy netting and spray on a sunny day --- no kiwis anywhere near me, grass is cut to within an inch of its life, mostly summer bedding and a regimented pristine setting, yuk! --- my place is the only one where hedgehogs, frogs, slow-worms and little geko-type things, lots of spiders, bees survive at least until next year when i have to sell up...

    thanks again, karaman
     
  7. misterQ

    misterQ Keen Gardener

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    Picture taken today.
    [​IMG]


    Are you sure your Kiwi is definitely an arguta Issai, karaman?

    I am just wondering why your plant looks different to mine, in particular, the leaf stalk colour and the distribution of anthers in the flower (circular pattern in mine but randomly in yours).
     
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