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Not a great start

Discussion in 'NEW Gardeners !' started by gooseygoo, Nov 1, 2019.

  1. shiney

    shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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    Garden compost and well rotted FYM will certainly help. This is the right time of year to dig it in. I wouldn't just leave it on the surface as you may need to improve the quality of the soil. A thin layer of compost can then be added to the surface.

    We have worked our garden with lots of trees etc. surrounding our veg plots. Digging in compost and FYM every Autumn/Winter has improved the condition and fertility of the soil. With regular improvement of the soil, and the digging that you do for it - removing any encroaching roots, should make it a good veg plot.

    Putting a barrier for the roots would certainly help but you could easily get by without it if you continue to improve the soil and dig well each year.

    Good luck :blue thumb:
     
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    • gooseygoo

      gooseygoo Apprentice Gardener

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      Thanks ! Silly question but where would I get well rotted fym...is that something I need to find from a farmer or do garden centres sell that sort of thing?
       
    • shiney

      shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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      Don'y get it from a garden centre - don't think they do it and if they do it will be expensive.

      You need well rotted horse manure. You can normally get it either from a farm that has horses or from a stables. Stables are usually quite happy for you to come and get it free of charge.

      If it's not well rotted then you need to put it in your garden compost heap and leave for a year.

      We now have a friend who has Falabella horses (miniatures) and they bring the fresh manure for us. I just dig it in to the compost heaps.
       
    • gooseygoo

      gooseygoo Apprentice Gardener

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      OK...there are plenty of horsey folk around me so I will go and see. I once heard that horse manure isnt so good because of all the wormer residue thats in it? Does this go if well rotted?
       
    • shiney

      shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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      I don't know about that and am not sure how much they would use per horse, if they use it all. I never have any problems. I don't think I can attribute my two horns and long tail to that - can I? :heehee:
       
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      • CarolineL

        CarolineL Total Gardener

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        Hi @gooseygoo most people only worm their horses once a year (spring) or maybe autumn too. It's a very small amount by comparison with the mountains of grass the horses eat, and therefore the amount of poo they produce! The main problem I find is that you often get weed seedlings if it didn't rot hot enough to kill them. But they rake out easily enough, and the benefit outweighs the downside. Try to take some old compost bags or something to collect it - stables may not have bags themselves. I favour plastic trugs.
         
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        • RobWar

          RobWar Apprentice Gardener

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          Hi. Can I ask a for some basic advice on a linked topic? I am in the process of double digging the garden of my new house. The soil level ends up a few inches higher than the original level because of all of the manure compost that I am digging in and because the soil is getting aerated as I go through. Do I have to wait for it to settle or can I start planting things now? If the former, how long should I wait? Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks.
           
        • JWK

          JWK Gardener Staff Member

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          Hi @RobWar, it depends on what you are planting, for veggies yes go ahead straight away after digging. Some crops like brassicas need firmer soil so you need to tread the soil around as your plant. For lawns you need to compact the soil before sowing.
           
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          • RobWar

            RobWar Apprentice Gardener

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            Hi John. Many thanks for this. I am not big on growing edibles and the area in question was lawn, which I have removed. I will be putting in a variety of shrubs and a couple of small trees and smaller plants. Would you suggest that I go ahead and start planting now, but tread in the soil? Really appreciate your help. Rob
             
          • JWK

            JWK Gardener Staff Member

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            For lawns you do need to compact it well prior to seeding. Walk over it on your heels and use a long board or ladder to ensure it's level. There is no need to wait for it to compact naturally.

            Are you planning to turf or seed?

            For the ornamental borders there is no need to compact. Just ensure each shrub or plant is firmed in.
             
          • RobWar

            RobWar Apprentice Gardener

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            Hi John. Thanks again. I have decided not to have a lawn in the new garden, but this means that I can get on with planting stuff straight away, which is really exciting! Best, Rob
             
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