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Plant suggestions for in front of fence

Discussion in 'Gardening Discussions' started by Voobwm, Apr 12, 2021.

  1. Voobwm

    Voobwm Apprentice Gardener

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    I just finished a 10m long, 5ft tall fence.

    I would like to plant some plants in front of it as its more pleasing to look at.

    I am not into plants, so I have no idea what to choose.

    I would like a row of mixed plants which can grow up to approx. 5ft or half way there, ever green, and hopefully flower in the spring/summer at least. They'll be in full sun up to mid-afternoon when sun goes behind house, then will get some evening sun along their tops. My soil is clay like. Its where there used to be leylandii trees (removed now).

    Anyone know names of plants I can buy that meet this criteria? OR a website that provides suggestions?

    I am surprised I cant find any website that shows me a row of plants and names them, and i can say "I'll have all those". Its like I have to spend ages researching all the plants and I haven't got time, I just want someone to give me a list to go buy! :D

    Thanks a lot
     
  2. Voobwm

    Voobwm Apprentice Gardener

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    For example, I just found a site selling "10 X MIXED ESTABLISHED GARDEN SHRUBS" ranging from 2ft to 15ft full grown. Although price at £34.99 seemed quite low. But the point is I dont really care what they are called and sounds good to leave it up to someone else to choose them for me, so buying a couple of these might be a good idea unless anyone has any other ideas.
     
  3. Black Dog

    Black Dog Gardener of useful things

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    I have lots of ideas but most are edibles (as some of you might already know about me).

    Without a picture of the fence it is always hard to tell what kind of plants would fit in there. And we don't know how much work you are willing to put into them.
     
  4. Spruce

    Spruce Glad to be back .....

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    hi roughly what part of the UK are you ? as this will help in what you can choose.... evergreen and flowers I would choose Pieris //// and Holly

    so many different varieties
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    [​IMG]

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    as long as you prepare the soil as it will be low in nutrients from the conifers ,, they are all slow growing and easily maintained
     
  5. Voobwm

    Voobwm Apprentice Gardener

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    I’m in Newport, Gwent.

    here’s my fence. It’s facing the south so gets the sun most of the day.
     

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  6. gks

    gks Gardener

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    What you will probably receive is 12 x small shrub liners. Most sites selling these show an image of what your shrubs will look like when fully grown, what you will actually receive is 12 mixed shrubs grown in 9cm square pots. Always best to read the description, most will say "You may not receive the plants pictured as they are selected at random from stock".
     
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    • Voobwm

      Voobwm Apprentice Gardener

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      No I know that, but that’s fine, they’ll be small and will hopefully grow and I know it’s not the image on the site.

      good thing about plants is if any don’t do well or don’t look good they can easily be replaced but I thought it may be a good starting point for a lazy person :)
       
    • Black Dog

      Black Dog Gardener of useful things

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      As usual, I would advise for some climbers. Maybe a grapevine or two alongside a few wires would make for a nice, fast growing sight without adding to much "depth". And they taste good as well.
       
    • Voobwm

      Voobwm Apprentice Gardener

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      Yes good idea. I had grapes years ago in another house. Great position for the full sun here. And then maybe some shrubs in front lowers down perhaps. Thanks.
       
    • SandyNI

      SandyNI Gardener

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      The biggest problem with buying a selection of shrubs and not knowing what will be in the set, they may not suit the position in your garden or the soil. I talk from experience! I've got heavy clay soil on an exposed windy hill and not a lot of sunlight.... not all shrubs take kindly to that!
       
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      • Black Dog

        Black Dog Gardener of useful things

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        @SandyNI
        Don't worry, those plants not suited for the climate conditions will quickly show you their discontent. After aggressively shedding their leaves they will hold their breath and dry up until you give them what they want and transport them to a more suitable place. I suggest the compost bin
         
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        • SandyNI

          SandyNI Gardener

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          My neighbours think I'm setting a new trend with numerous bare sticks poking through the soil. I leave them for a while in the hope they may adapt.
           
        • Black Dog

          Black Dog Gardener of useful things

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          Most of my garden started like that.

          They thought I was crazy for planting bulbs in Dezember 2019 (after we freshly bought the house)
          They thought otherwise in spring

          They watched with pitiful faces from their perfectly mowed lawn as I killed off rows and rows of rhododendron and planted some sad looking sticks in their place and dug through the dirt.

          Now I am eating pumpkins, peas, blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, currants, cherries, apples, grapes, persimmon, almonds, figs and rhubarb while watching the bees in my garden. They can munch on their hydrangea and boxwood while listening to their lawnmower-robot for all I care.
           
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          • Selleri

            Selleri Koala

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            Let me hazard a guess that you may have young ones using those swings? :biggrin: If so, there's a brilliant opportunity to plant edible things to see how the things grow day by day, and to let them munch berries from a bush without asking for a permission. Works for all age groups.

            If you are a self confessed minimalist when it comes to effort, the grapevines in the back, some tough-as-boots berry shrubs in front (Blackcurrant?) and a ground cover of alpine (or "wild") strawberries could make an easy start.

            Blackcurrants are often available in Wilkos and even Poundland, and will make good size shrubs this summer. Alpine strawberries are very easy to grow from seeds, and will quickly spread to make a ground cover (win-win, no weeds but berries, evergreen, no maintenance required).

            Wilkos usually have a good selection of fruit shrubs very cheaply around now.

            Then something evergreen non-toxic for winter interest... hmmm...

            Anyways, it's a very good idea to dig a deep and wide trench and fill it with good compost and manure mix. Hard work, but you will only have to do it once and it will make all the difference for the plants.

            And if the kids are interested, well prepared soil allows all kinds of summer experiments between the shrubs, such as mangetout peas, giant strawberries or sunflowers. Very easy and fun. :)
             
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