Please help identify weed taking over lawn

Discussion in 'Gardening Discussions' started by RyanOtekki, Jul 6, 2020.

  1. RyanOtekki

    RyanOtekki Apprentice Gardener

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    Hi

    Over the last few months something has been taking over my lawn. Can anyone help identify and how to treat it?
    Many thanks
     

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  2. Hazel Twigg

    Hazel Twigg Apprentice Gardener

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    First pic looks like creeping buttercup and the third pic looks like marsh marigold. I would dig them up or apply a spot kill weedkiller. Cant remember the name but it comes with a paintbrush in the lid to apply without harming nearby foliage.
     
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    • Scrungee

      Scrungee Well known for it

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      3rd Image looks like Gound Ivy. It has a pungent smell, crush and sniff.

      [​IMG]
       
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      • hans

        hans Gardener

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      • Graham B

        Graham B Gardener

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        Third pic looks like mallow to me. The leaves are more round than ground ivy.

        Malva - Wikipedia

        I have problems with it too. The bad news is that it's got a big long taproot, and the plant can get fairly large if it gets the chance (at least a foot tall and 2' wide). The good news is that if you can catch it early, it's pretty easy to pull up. Even if you let it get bigger, if the soil is loose then it's still fairly easy to shift because it doesn't have much in the way of other roots, and if you get most of the root up then the rest is probably going to snuff it. Weedkiller is an option if there's a lot of it, but honestly it's easiest to sort with a garden fork and elbow grease.

        Just to warn you too, they're perennial so they won't just die over winter. And they self-seed like nobody's business, so you do want to shift them before they get a chance to.
         
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