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Rose bushes and glyphosphate

Discussion in 'Roses' started by Notrub, Sep 9, 2019.

  1. Notrub

    Notrub Apprentice Gardener

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    If rose bushes are pruned back to wood and allowed to seal, would they be unaffected by glyphosphate?

    My mother has a number of beds containing old rose bushes that are surrounded by brambles and horsetails and it would be far easier to deal with if we could simply blanket spray the whole area several times.
     
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    • wiseowl

      wiseowl Friendly Owl ADMIN Staff Member

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      Good evening @Notrub Roses are highly susceptible to glyphosphate and sealed cane ends or not I wouldn't fancy their chances at all:smile:

      Glyphosate (e.g. Roundup, SBM Job done General Purpose Weedkiller or Doff Glyphosate Weedkiller) damage shows as leaf yellowing and browning, and shoots collapse on soft-stemmed plants. Roses and raspberries are particularly sensitive to glyphosate from July onwards. This causes stunting and leaf malformation, which may not be evident until the following season. Roses produce clusters of short, often pale shoots appear that resemble mini witches’ brooms.

      Capture.JPG
       
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      • ARMANDII

        ARMANDII Low Flying Administrator Staff Member

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        Pruning allowed to seal on any shrub
        Glyphsophate sprayed onto Roses, or any other shrubs, will be stored in them whether pruned or not and if it doesn't kill them then and there will certainly affect them the following year by at the very least stunting them and growth of the leaves becoming narrow. I would not advise any blanket spraying and would use great caution if you decided to spray the soil around the Roses as should any of the Glyphosphate get on the stems it will kill them.:coffee::cat-kittyandsmiley:
         
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        • noisette47

          noisette47 Total Gardener

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          Hi Notrub, I wonder whether the solution would be to prune, bag up the roses in heavy-duty bin bags, then spray? Once the glypho is dry, there shouldn't be any ill effects to the roses. You're right in thinking that you'll need to spray more than once, but subsequent re-growth could be dealt with by spraying into a cut-off plant pot placed around the weed.
           
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          • NigelJ

            NigelJ Total Gardener

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            Given you have both bramble and horsetail in with the roses I would be tempted to lift the roses this winter, plant into a clean area and then next spring clean out the weeds and replant the roses when you are sure the area is clear of the problem.
             
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            • shiney

              shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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              If you lift them you would need to wash off all the soil as there is likely to be bits of horsetail caught in the soil. It only takes a tiny bit to regrow.
               
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